Williamson County leaders ask for parity in funding in letter to Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority

Williamson County courthouse
Williamson County Commissioners sent a letter to the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority outlining the county's priorities for the transportation agency on Jan. 25. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

Williamson County Commissioners sent a letter to the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority outlining the county's priorities for the transportation agency on Jan. 25. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

Williamson County Commissioners Court is asking the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority to fund projects in Travis and Williamson counties at equal levels.

This request was outlined in a Jan. 25 letter addressed to Mobility Authority Chair Bobby Jenkins. Williamson County Commissioners Court discussed its priorities for the Mobility Authority and authorized Gravell to sign the letter at its Jan. 25 meeting.

The Mobility Authority is an independent government agency created in 2002 with the goal of improving mobility throughout Travis and Williamson counties, according to its website. The Mobility Agency broke ground on its 183 North expansion project Jan. 26.

In addition to funding projects at an equal level, the letter requests the Mobility Authority aid in preserving the right of way for future projects and establish a cash reserve that would allow the agency to fund more local projects in Williamson County.

“I’ve drafted a letter ... basically saying that we appreciate that [the Mobility Authority has] been great stewards of the resources that you’ve had and we want to suggest that the cash reserve policy that you have put forth to build those reserves will benefit Williamson County,” Precinct 2 Commissioner Cynthia Long said.



Long said although the Mobility Authority’s first project, 183A Toll, was built in Williamson County, since then many projects have been in Travis County.

“One of the things that strikes me is the amount of lane miles—and I don’t know how many it is—that the [Mobility Authority] has built in Central Texas,” Long said. “But I will say a vast majority of those have been in Travis County.”

Long said while she understands the need for the projects in Travis County, she does not want Williamson County to be penalized for “being proactive and planning.”

“As we look at the fund balance of the CTRMA going forward and the choices you make, don’t punish Williamson County because we made some good choices,” Precinct 4 Commissioner Russ Boles said. “We are 50% of it. Keep us in that position.”

Citing the population and development growth the area has experienced in the past 10 years, the letter asks for the Mobility Authority's help in preserving right of way land for future roadways while that land is still available.

“Having roadway options in the future will provide Williamson County residents personal mobility, ability to avoid traffic congestion and retain the quality of life that they currently enjoy as one of the healthiest counties in the nation,” the letter reads.

During its Jan. 25 meeting, commissioners also unanimously approved the reappointment of David Singleton to the seven-member Mobility Authority board of directors for a two-year term.

“[Singleton] has served on the CTRMA board since its inception and has represented Williamson County well on that board,” Long said.

Read the full letter below.

By Claire Shoop

Reporter, Northwest Austin

Claire joined Community Impact Newspaper in September 2019 as the reporter for the Sugar Land/Missouri City edition and in December 2021 moved to Austin to become the reporter for the Northwest Austin edition. She graduated from The University of Texas at Austin in May 2019 where she studied journalism, government and Arabic. While in school, Claire was a fellow for The Texas Tribune, worked for the student newspaper, The Daily Texan, and spent a semester in Washington, D.C. She enjoys playing cards with her family and listening to the Boss, Bruce Springsteen.