U.S. Rep. Carter wins Republican primary for District 31 seat

Updated March 2 at 7:50 a.m.

U.S. Rep. John Carter, R-Round Rock, won the Republican primary election for the District 31 seat, earning 71.3 percent of the vote in Bell and Williamson counties.

With all but one precinct reporting in Williamson, Carter earned 62,656 of the total 87,901 votes. His opponent, Mike Sweeney of Georgetown, received 25,245, or 28.7 percent, of the vote. All results are unofficial until canvassed.

Only one Democrat, Mike Clark of Georgetown, filed for the March primary election, and Carter and Clark will face off in the November general election.

On election night, Carter said if he is re-elected he plans to use the opportunity to get Texas ideas heard in Washington, D.C.

"I'm very grateful these two counties in Central Texas honored me with this position and continue to show it with their votes," he said.

Updated March 1 at 11:15 p.m.

U.S. Rep. John Carter, R-Round Rock, has held onto his strong lead over opponent Mike Sweeney in the Republican primary election for the District 31 seat.

As of 11:15 p.m. with about half of the precincts reporting in both Bell and Williamson counties, Carter has about 70.9 percent, or 44,392, of 62,587 votes. Sweeney received 18,195 votes, or 29.1 percent. All results are unofficial until canvassed.

Carter said he is confident the numbers will hold.

He was first elected to the seat in 2002. Carter said he ran for re-election because in Washington, D.C. as elected officials gain more experience, they get more opportunities to make common-sense change.

"I’m always honored my friends and neighbors allow me to go back and represent them in Washington," he said. "They have been very, very kind to me, and I'm appreciative to have another chance to get the conservative message to Washington."

Updated March 1 at 7:33 p.m.

U.S. Rep. John Carter, R-Round Rock, has earned about 70.7 percent of early votes in Bell and Williamson counties for the District 31 seat in the Republican primary.

Carter earned 29,854 votes of 42,233 total votes cast in the two counties. His opponent, Mike Sweeney of Georgetown, earned 12,379 votes or 29.3 percent. Results are unofficial until canvassed.

In Williamson County, Carter earned 20,201 votes of the total 29,055 votes, or 69.5 percent. Sweeney garnered 30.5 percent, or 8,854 votes. In Bell County, Carter earned 73.25 percent, or 9,653 of 13,178 total votes. Sweeney received 3,525 votes, or 26.75 percent.

Posted Feb. 29

U.S. Rep. John Carter faces opposition for re-election to the District 31 seat in the upcoming March 1 primary election.

District 31 covers cities in Williamson County, including Northwest Austin, Round Rock, Cedar Park, Leander, Taylor and Georgetown. It also stretches north to Killeen and Temple in Bell County.

Carter is a Round Rock resident who has held the District 31 seat since 2003. His opponent, Mike Sweeney, is a Georgetown resident and business owner. Only one Democrat, Mike Clark of Georgetown, filed for the March primary election.

Rep. John Carter Rep. John Carter[/caption]

John Carter
Experience: U.S. representative since 2003, district judge in Williamson County, attorney
www.johncarterforcongress.com

Top priorities
• Military and defense
• Border security
• Reduce our debt and cut government spending

Why do you want to hold this office?


I am honored to serve and represent the largest military installation in the world. I take great pride in fighting every day to support and provide for the men and women who defend our freedoms. It is my great interest in ensuring I am doing all I can in my position to make a positive impact on the lives of our soldiers and families, and provide them with the tools they need to be successful and remain the best, most prepared armed forces in the world. I take great pride in doing everything possible to bring Central Texas values to Washington, DC and keeping Washington, DC out of Texas.

If re-elected, what is the first thing you intend to do?


Fight for the men and women of our military that defend freedoms every day by providing them the support and resources they need to continue to be the best military in the world.




Mike Sweeney Mike Sweeney[/caption]

Mike Sweeney
Experience: business owner and CEO for 24 years; lifelong career in technology; lived and worked internationally in Israel, Iran, and Africa working with other countries’ governments and workforce leaders; served on the board of a special utility district; served 12 years as a board member of a federal credit union
www.MikeSweeney4Congress.com

Top priorities
• The security of our citizens and our nation is the primary responsibility of our government. The funding requirements for our security include our military, border security, cybersecurity and vulnerable infrastructures such as our electrical grid.
• Funding the elimination of inefficient, ineffective and overstepping agencies such as the Department of Education, EPA and the Department of Energy will result in long term ROI for the country. Monies currently allocated to the states through theses departments should continue in the form of block grants.
• Restoring Social Security and Medicare funding that has been usurped by my opponent’s votes to fund the Obama agenda, which includes Obamacare. One of my priorities is to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Why do you want to hold this office?


My major goal is to control federal spending and stop the ever-increasing national debt. I will promote a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution. We must make the hard choices and live within our means. I will promote the use of zero-based budgeting to examine all federal departments and programs … [and] eliminate waste in spending by identifying agencies that are ripe for reduction or removal. … I will promote block grants to allow our states to determine and manage how best to utilize their funds. I will seek to eliminate federal bureaucracies by transferring programs to the private sector, leaving the oversight responsibilities to Congress.

If elected, what is the first thing you intend to do?


Identify like-minded Conservatives and begin the process of building a coalition to reverse the spending and regulation agenda of the Washington Establishment imposed on us by my opponent.
By Amy Denney
Amy has worked for Community Impact Newspaper since September 2010, serving as reporter and then senior editor for the Northwest Austin edition and covering transportation. She is now managing editor for the nine publications in the Central Texas area.


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