New Braunfels, Comal ISDs set to begin work on approved bond propositions

Two of three New Braunfels ISD propositions passed while three of five Comal ISD propositions passed during the Nov. 2 election. (Courtesy Stantec Architecture)
Two of three New Braunfels ISD propositions passed while three of five Comal ISD propositions passed during the Nov. 2 election. (Courtesy Stantec Architecture)

Two of three New Braunfels ISD propositions passed while three of five Comal ISD propositions passed during the Nov. 2 election. (Courtesy Stantec Architecture)

During the Nov. 2 election, voters in New Braunfels and Comal ISDs approved several bond propositions in each district aimed at maintaining existing facilities and constructing new campuses.

In both districts, bond measures designed to provide funding for recreational facilities and stadiums failed to receive voter approval.

NBISD officials presented three propositions to voters with funding to construct new schools and purchase busses included in Proposition A, funding for a varsity competition stadium and upgrades to the New Braunfels High School press box included in Proposition B, and funding to update technology across the district included in Proposition C.

Propositions A and C were passed by voters, but approximately 54% of voters voted against Proposition B.

The new bond total for the district will be $327.9 million, down from the $348 million proposed bond.


The district is slated to replace playgrounds at six elementary schools as one of the first projects included in the bond, NBISD Superintendent Cade Smith wrote in a letter to the district. The playground improvements are expected to be completed during the 2022-23 school year.

“Along with the playground upgrades, the expansion of the Ninth Grade Center into the district’s second high school will be first with designing, bidding, and preparing for construction,” Smith wrote. “Breaking ground on Long Creek High School is projected to take place a little over a year from now, with an opening in the 2024-25 school year.”

In Comal ISD, voters were presented with five bond propositions, three of which were approved Nov. 2.

Proposition A was passed to approve the ad valorem tax rate of $1.292 to generate revenue to be used for staffing and employee compensation.

Proposition B passed and will provide funding for the construction and renovation of school facilities. Proposition C failed and would have provided funding to renovate recreational facilities. Proposition D failed and would have provided funding to construct and expand stadium facilities. Proposition E passed and will provide funding for technology acquisition.

Propositions C and D received 55.77% and 60.54% of votes in opposition, respectively.

Improvements to athletic facilities at six campuses and stadium expansions at Canyon Lake High School and Davenport High school were included in propositions C and D.

Without the two failed propositions, the bond total dropped from $527.7 million to $445.83 million.

Through the passage of Proposition A, the district’s maintenance and operations tax rate will be $0.942 per $100 valuation, up from the projected no-new-revenue rate of $0.87 per $100 valuation.

“The approval of Proposition A allows us to increase the compensation of our teachers and staff and attract additional teachers as we continue to grow,” CISD board President Jason York wrote in a press release.

Comal ISD currently has some of the lowest teacher and staff compensation rates in the region, according to district officials.

The districts have not released plans to address the projects that failed to receive voter approval.

All election results are unofficial until canvassed.
By Lauren Canterberry

Reporter, New Braunfels

Lauren joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in October 2019. After graduating with a degree in journalism from the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, Lauren was a freelance journalist and worked as a college English teacher in China. At CI, Lauren covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in New Braunfels.



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