New Braunfels advisory board postpones recommendation for proposed animal sale ordinance

The board has been discussing a potential ordinance since late 2021. (Lauren Canterberry/Community Impact Newspaper)
The board has been discussing a potential ordinance since late 2021. (Lauren Canterberry/Community Impact Newspaper)

The board has been discussing a potential ordinance since late 2021. (Lauren Canterberry/Community Impact Newspaper)

During a March 3 board meeting, members of the New Braunfels Animal Services Advisory Board postponed a recommendation to City Council regarding a proposed ordinance that would regulate the commercial sale of dogs and cats within city limits.

The decision was made following more than an hour of discussion conducted in closed session in which board members and city staff evaluated four potential options for the ordinance, said Christopher Looney, planning and development services director for the city.

“The board decided that they wanted to take a little more time to examine any other options that might be out there at a subsequent meeting,” Looney said. “Just to make sure that whatever they recommend is legally sound.”

New Braunfels officials began considering potential regulations in October after City Council members recommended that the board should discuss options for an ordinance to address commercial animal sales.

City staff reviewed similar ordinances in other cities in Texas when drafting the options, Looney said, one of which was an ordinance passed by San Antonio in October 2020 that banned the commercial sale of pets within city limits.


Independent breeders who sell directly to the public are not affected by the ordinance.

The New Braunfels board is responsible for reviewing potential ordinance language and making a recommendation to council following its discussions, Looney said.

Ultimately, any city ordinance that is adopted must be enforceable, understandable to residents and legal, he said.

“We don't want to adopt something that's unconstitutional or [where] the state statute preempts the city,” Looney said. “Whenever cities are adopting ordinances, they look at is it illegal and then will it lead to litigation a city would have to spend taxpayer dollars to defend.”

Board members are expected to continue discussions at an upcoming meeting. A date and time for that meeting has not been set.
By Lauren Canterberry

Reporter, New Braunfels

Lauren joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in October 2019. After graduating with a degree in journalism from the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, Lauren was a freelance journalist and worked as a college English teacher in China. At CI, Lauren covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in New Braunfels.