TEA reviewing social studies learning standards, seeking public input

The state will make changes to its learning standards for social studies which will be implemented in the 2025-26 school year. (Community Impact Newspaper)
The state will make changes to its learning standards for social studies which will be implemented in the 2025-26 school year. (Community Impact Newspaper)

The state will make changes to its learning standards for social studies which will be implemented in the 2025-26 school year. (Community Impact Newspaper)

The state’s process for reviewing social studies learning standards is underway. Roughly 800 people, mostly educators, have applied to join work groups that could shape the new requirements.

Social studies Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, or TEKS—state standards for what students should know—are set to change starting in the 2025-26 school year, said Jessica Snyder, Texas Education Agency special projects manager, during a Jan. 13 meeting about the process.

TEA staff are sifting through hundreds of applications for members of the work groups, which will ultimately present suggestions to the state education board this summer, said Curriculum Division Director Shelly Ramos.

Ramos said the size and number of work groups is not set in stone, but for a recent revision of science TEKS, the agency selected roughly 90 work group members. For the social studies revision, staff will look for applicants who have experience in the specific content areas that the TEKS will address, although work group members do not need to be educators. Applications are open with an unclear end date.

“We try to find some well-rounded folks who we think would be a benefit to a work group,” Ramos said.


As of Jan. 13, TEA staff were looking for teachers with experience teaching high school-level psychology and sociology classes, Ramos said.

Staff intend to send out work group invitations to applicants by the end of the month, following the Texas State Board of Education meetings starting Jan. 25.

The first work group, which will focus on personal finance curriculum for high school students, has already been selected. During the late January meetings, the board will determine what content area the next work group will focus on.

“Staff is, as I think many others may be, waiting with bated breath,” TEA staff member Monica Martinez said.
By Maggie Quinlan

Reporter, Southwest Austin/Dripping Springs

Maggie joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in July 2021 after a year spent covering crime, courts and politics at The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, near the border with Idaho. In Southwest Austin and Dripping Springs, Maggie covers education, business, healthcare, transportation, real estate development and nonprofits. Prior to CI, she graduated from Washington State University, where she was managing editor of the student newspaper and a section editor at her hometown newspaper based in Moscow, Idaho. Maggie dreamed of living in the Austin area for years and feels honored to serve the communities of Southwest Austin and Dripping Springs.