Peace Frog Carpet & Tile Cleaning in Cedar Park aims to focus on values, customer service

Manager Jason Schmidt said environmentally conscious services are important to people in the Austin area. Manager Jason Schmidt said environmentally conscious services are important to people in the Austin area.[/caption]

In the past six years, Peace Frog Carpet & Tile Cleaning has grown from one van to a fleet of seven. Owner and founder Matthew Hagebusch said he credits the company’s success to its focus on moral life principles and customer service.


“I think what makes our company unique is the culture,” Hagebusch said. “When you care about your work, the people and doing what’s right, the money just comes.”


Peace Frog is an earth-, environmental- and people-friendly company that focuses on multiple services, including cleaning carpet, tile, wood and upholstery as well as automotive and power washing, Manager Jason Schmidt said. Peace Frog has a location on Bell Boulevard in Cedar Park and on I-35 in Austin.


The company’s products are human- and pet-friendly, Schmidt said, adding that environmentally conscious services are important to many in the Austin area.


Manager James Swinney said Peace Frog asks questions about a customer’s home to determine the frequency of cleanings. The company’s carpet-cleaning machines have about 35 horsepower.


“They are extremely more powerful than your household vacuum,” Swinney said of the benefits of getting a professional carpet cleaning from Peace Frog. “There are a lot of people that have real bad allergies, especially here in Austin, so it’s going to help tremendously.”


He said carpet care can be compared to car maintenance.




Owner and founder Matthew Hagebusch chose a smiling tree frog showing the peace sign as the business’ logo. Owner and founder Matthew Hagebusch chose a smiling tree frog showing the peace sign as the business’ logo.[/caption]

“If you want it to look better for longer and actually maintain it and not have to replace it so soon, keeping it cleaned is going to be your best option,” he said. 


Aside from Cedar Park and Leander, Schmidt said clients from Georgetown, South Austin and sometimes beyond hire Peace Frog services, and the company has a following of repeat customers who often refer their friends.


“We’re honest men and women who do honest work,” Schmidt said. “We like to do things the right way the first time.”


Peace Frog is in the process of adding an eighth van and plans to hire more staff in the near future, Hagebusch said.


“My job as owner is to facilitate growth,” he said. “So whenever it’s time to add more staff and more equipment, I see to that. But if it doesn’t grow any bigger at all, I’d still be thrilled. This is really a dream come true for me.”



MOST RECENT

Pastries
Seattle's Piroshky Piroshky Bakery bringing pastries to Cedar Park April 21

The bakery will bring its famous Russian pastries to Cedar Park for a one-day event.

The Pushing for Justice Caravan for Javier Ambler was held in San Gabriel Park on Aug. 15. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Javier Ambler’s Law awaits Texas Senate approval

The bill passed the House on April 15.

Jack Allen's Kitchen will be at 1345 E. Whitestone Blvd., Cedar Park. (Rendering courtesy Jack Allen's Kitchen)
7 restaurants coming to Cedar Park, Leander; new murals to go up in Georgetown and more top area news

Read the top business and community news from the Central Texas area from the past week.

The program, which began this week in San Marcos, gives Amazon and Whole Foods employees and contractors direct access to COVID-19 vaccinations. (Courtesy Amazon)
Amazon begins rollout of statewide vaccination clinics for employees

The program, which began this week in San Marcos, gives Amazon and Whole Foods employees and contractors direct access to COVID-19 vaccinations.

See how Leander and Cedar Park real estate fared in March. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)
See how Leander, Cedar Park real estate fared in March

The Central Texas real estate market continues to set housing records despite affordability growing pains, according to March Austin Board of Realtors data.

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from Williamson County. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
New coronavirus cases continue to be reported even as vaccinations ramp up in Williamson County

Here are the most recent coronavirus updates from Williamson County.

Austin FC supporters celebrate the official announcement of the team in January 2019. (Amy Denney/Community Impact Newspaper)
How, where to watch historic first Austin FC match April 17

Check out this list of breweries, pubs and restaurants around Central Texas that are hosting watch parties for April 17's inaugural Austin FC game.

Z'Tejas' chorizo dumplings are served on the Arboretum location's porch. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)
Z'Tejas to open in Avery Ranch; butcher, deli to open in Dripping Springs and more Central Texas news

Read the latest business and community news from the Central Texas area.

Williamson County Judge Bill Gravell predicted the end of mass vaccination sites by Memorial Day. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Williamson County judge predicts end of most mass vaccination sites by Memorial Day

As of April 14, its waitlist had dwindled to fewer than 50 for those in phases 1A, 1B and 1C and teachers, officials said.

Photo of a sign that says "Travis County"
Travis County establishes new emergency rental assistance program for 2021

The program will provide $10.7 million in aid to county residents struggling to pay rent due to the pandemic.

Plank Seafood Provisions opened inside The Domain in late March. (Courtesy Richard Casteel)
Seafood spot opens in The Domain; All Star Liquor now serving Georgetown and more Central Texas news

Read the latest business and community news from the Central Texas area.

Federal funding is set aside for public schools to address effects of the pandemic. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Why Texas has not yet distributed $18 billion in federal funds intended for public schools

As budget decisions loom for school districts across Texas, state leaders are holding on to federal funds intended for public schools to use in addressing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.