Rollingwood elects three new council members, renews sales tax

Alec Robinson, Brook Brown and Phil McDuffee were each elected to seats on the Rollingwood City Council in the Nov. 2 election. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Alec Robinson, Brook Brown and Phil McDuffee were each elected to seats on the Rollingwood City Council in the Nov. 2 election. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Alec Robinson, Brook Brown and Phil McDuffee were each elected to seats on the Rollingwood City Council in the Nov. 2 election. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

City of Rollingwood residents elected three new City Council members in the Nov. 2 election. Alec Robinson won a seat with 23.93% of the votes, followed by Brook Brown with 22.45% and Phil McDuffee with 22.09%.

During their campaigns, candidates consistently stated interest in addressing the city's water infrastructure, given Rollingwood’s history with frequent water line leaks and subsequent boil notices for residents, according to their candidate forum Oct. 19.

During this forum, candidates also mentioned focusing on increasing government transparency and building comprehensive communication with the community about important information, including City Council agenda items.

Robinson is an engineer who has lived in Rollingwood for over a decade with his wife and two daughters. With an electrical engineering background in product development, operations and financial modeling, Robinson said he wants to focus on increasing communication with the community and fixing the water infrastructure in Rollingwood. Robinson said he went door-to-door in the community speaking with residents about issues they wanted resolved in their city.

“The process of going door-to-door campaigning really confirmed what I believed to be true when I started this, which is that our community is ready to see some new faces on the City Council,” Robinson said. “I’m super excited to be part of the team to serve the community, and I’m eager to get started.”



Brown has been a resident of Rollingwood since 1980, serving as a volunteer municipal judge for three years in the late 1990s and as a member of the board of adjustment this year, according to the candidate forum. She also served on the Comprehensive Plan Strike Force, a committee created in October 2020 tasked with developing a mission for the city based on community feedback and communicating those recommendations to the City Council, Brown said.

Brown said the city is facing three major problems: its water system, drainage and the road expansion project on MoPac South. Brown also said during the Oct. 19 candidate forum that she wants to focus on transparency—a major issue residents brought up on the Comprehensive Plan Strike Force survey in the past year—and building consensus among community entities to bring long-term capital projects to fruition.

“I feel an awesome responsibility to continue to support the community and do the work they elected me to do,” Brown said. “Rollingwood is a very special place, and I’m humbled to be elected to represent it.”

McDuffee has been a Rollingwood resident for 17 years and has a background mainly as a computer programmer, working at engineering firm Parsons Corporation on financial planning and infrastructure design, according to the candidate forum. In addition to the issues revolving around water and transparency, McDuffee said he would like to facilitate comprehensive analysis on projects to determine true cost and cement community buy-in.

“We’re very grateful and humbled by the trust that has been given to us by the community,” McDuffee said. “I had never run for political office before and never had any desire to do so, but I met a lot of really amazing people in Rollingwood and got to know them on a deep level. I’m excited to serve them.”

Rollingwood residents also approved a measure Nov. 2 to renew a $0.025 sales tax on goods purchased in the city to generate funds for maintenance and repair of municipal streets. The city estimates the tax will generate $150,000 annually, having collected over $1.3 million since its introduction in 2009 and subsequent reauthorization every four years.

By


MOST RECENT

Santa meets with children at the city of Lakeway's previous Lights On! event. (Courtesy city of Lakeway)
Holiday events happening this weekend in Lake Travis-Westlake

The city of Lakeway and Bee Cave Chamber of Commerce are putting on two holiday events in Lake Travis-Westlake on Dec. 4.

San Marcos Fuel Express is located at 5403 I-35, San Marcos. (Zara Flores/Community Impact Newspaper)
San Marcos Fuel Express now open

The new gas station also features a drive-thru car wash and Hunt Brothers Pizza.

Consuelo Mendez Middle School has consistently received poor ratings from the Texas Education Agency. (Community Impact Newspaper)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: State could take over AISD school board if poorly-rated campus does not improve; new furniture store to open in McKinney and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Dec. 3.

Derrick Chubbs is leaving Austin for a food bank in Florida. (Courtsey Central Texas Food Bank)
Central Texas Food Bank CEO Derrick Chubbs steps down

Derrick Chubbs is leaving Austin for a food bank in Florida.

Police Chief Glen Koen meets with members of the community at the Lakeway Police Department meet and greet event on Dec. 2. (Grace Dickens/Community Impact Newspaper)
Lakeway Police Department welcomes chief with meet and greet

Lakeway community members met with new police Chief Glen Koen on Nov. 2.

Santa Claus visits with two festival attendees at Westlake Wonderfest. (Courtesy of Westlake Chamber of Commerce)
Westlake Wonderfest holiday event coming Dec. 5

Families can head to West Lake Hills this weekend to enjoy Westlake Wonderfest for free.

Consuelo Mendez Middle School has consistently received poor ratings from the Texas Education Agency. (Community Impact Newspaper)
State could take over AISD school board if poorly rated campus does not improve next year

If the school does receive an improved rating, the state's commissioner of education could replace every member of Austin ISD's school board.

Austin ISD trustee Noelita Lugo argues for breaking down student achievement measures by race in the district's 2021-2026 scorecard, rather than examining only economically disadvantaged students without racial groups. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin ISD considers how to measure equity gaps in academic achievement

Austin ISD trustees are continuing to work out details of the 2021-2026 district scorecard, which measures progress on equity goals.

Austin City Council made changes to arts and library funding among other decisions Dec. 2. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin City Hall notebook: Arts community, homeless health care program get funding, plus other actions

City Council approved more than 50 items Dec. 2, changing the Office of Civil Rights, doling out funding and more.

Council Member Greg Casar speaks at a press conference outside City Hall ahead of a vote to approve an ordinance granting the Austin Office of Civil Rights enforcement power. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin Office of Civil Rights granted new powers

An ordinance passed by Austin City Council on Dec. 2 creates additional civil and criminal penalties for discrimination.

The school board will consider whether to call a special election to fill the vacancy or make an appointment. (Zara Flores/Community Impact Newspaper)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Hays CISD to hold special meeting on resignation of board member; Montgomery approves plan for downtown and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Dec. 2.