Lakeway Comprehensive Plan entering final phases in run-up to submission to City Council

On Jan. 13, Larry Harlan, chair of Lakeway's Comprehensive Planning Committee, provided council with more specific goals pertaining to Lakeway's Comprehensive Plan.
On Jan. 13, Larry Harlan, chair of Lakeway's Comprehensive Planning Committee, provided council with more specific goals pertaining to Lakeway's Comprehensive Plan. (Brian Rash/Community Impact)

On Jan. 13, Larry Harlan, chair of Lakeway's Comprehensive Planning Committee, provided council with more specific goals pertaining to Lakeway's Comprehensive Plan. (Brian Rash/Community Impact)

After nearly a year of work from city officials and a specially appointed steering committee, March 16 has been set as the official deadline for when Lakeway’s comprehensive plan will be submitted to City Council.

As city officials describe it, the comprehensive plan will be a living document intended to guide the city on the bulk of its future decisions pertaining to significant issues, including zoning, future land use and transportation.

On Jan. 13, Larry Harlan, chair of Lakeway's Comprehensive Planning Committee, provided council with more specific goals within the next two months and said the timeline in the run-up to the March 16 deadline includes a proposed open house for public input at City Hall on Feb. 5 and submission to Lakeway’s Planning and Zoning Commission on March 4.

During a November update, city leaders and the Lakeway Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee discussed how best to proceed with revenue strategies moving into the next two decades and beyond. That discussion continued Jan. 13.

More than half of Lakeway is residential and 25% is greenspace, LPZC member Carolyn Nichols said. She explained that a sizeable chunk of the city’s revenue comes from property taxes and thus constitutes a major consideration in the composition of the comprehensive plan.


The Future Land Use Map, or FLUM, was also a point of discussion during the comprehensive plan update. The FLUM presented to council Jan. 13 showed a proposal with 1,964 acres of green space, 3,896 acres of residential space and 856 acres of commercial space.

Nichols said flexibility regarding the density of future developments should be considered as developers request it instead of designating areas as high- or low-density in advance.. She added that Lakeway’s definition of whether mixed-use developments should always include a residential component should also be considered.

“It seems like in the areas I’ve studied across Texas, high-density residential is always included in successful communities,” Nichols said.

Interim City Manager Julie Oakley pointed out the comprehensive plan needs to include consideration of revenue drivers as development slows once Lakeway approaches build-out.

Sean Garretson, a representative of Pegasus Planning and Development LLC, addressed council regarding changing city demographics and said a key change within Lakeway shows the percentage of its population between ages 35-44 has dropped by 40% since 2000 and that the median age went from 43.8 in 2010 to 47.7 in 2018.

"The impact of that fiscally is you may not be getting as much property tax from those folks as they claim senior exemptions," Garretson said.

Other data shows that 90% of Lakeway residents work outside of Lakeway, and 90% of workers employed within Lakeway live outside city limits.

These and other factors mean city leaders need to diversify their strategies pertaining to economic development, Garretson said.

As one example, Garretson said it would be beneficial to look into trying to attract more professional employers to Lakeway.

Also discussed during the Jan. 13 update was whether a tract along Hwy. 71 should be zoned as commercial, mixed-use or high-density residential in order to increase city revenue. Mayor Sandy Cox said she would be interested in looking into whether a mixed-use residential development might work in that area.

Population also factored in to the discussion. Nichols said over the next 20 years, Lakeway will likely reach a population 21,000 and 23,000. City leaders and council members are going to have to be thinking about higher-density population or other means of generating revenue in the next two decades, she said.

Nichols pointed out city leaders should be aware of and proactive regarding the kinds of businesses and revenue possible due to the redevelopment of RM 620, which she said she believes will be one of the most crucial elements of the evolution of Lakeway over the next several years.

"[RM] 620 will be the place to keep our eye on, and our goal here is to continue to be a mostly residential community with high-quality services," Nichols said. "So the juggle is going to be, "How do we do that?'"

The next step of the planning process involves the Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee emailing a draft of the plan to the Zoning and Planning Commission and City Council by Jan. 21.
SHARE THIS STORY
By Brian Rash

Brian has been a reporter and editor since 2012. He wrote about the music scene in Dallas-Fort Worth before becoming managing editor for the Graham Leader in Graham, Texas, in 2013. He relocated to Austin, Texas, in 2015 to work for Gatehouse Media's large design hub. He became the editor for the Lake Travis-Westlake publication of Community Impact in August 2018.


MOST RECENT

Lakeway Police Chief Todd Radford addresses City Council during the Feb. 18 meeting. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
Victims services coordinator position coming to Lakeway

The Lakeway Police Department will soon welcome a new victims services coordinator to its ranks due to a state grant approved Oct. 1.

Lakeway Communications Director Jarrod Wise addressed City Council during the Feb. 18 meeting. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
Lakeway to conduct second community survey

About 32% of residents are retired. Roughly 54% of all households have two people. Almost 69% of all residences have no children under the age of 18 living in them.

Building and Development Services Director Charlotte Hodges addresses City Council during the Feb. 18 meeting. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
Food trucks now permitted at special Lakeway events

Lakeway City Council approved an ordinance amendment during its Feb. 18 meeting that allows for temporary and mobile food vendors to operate at city permitted special events

Committee Chair Vickie Taylor addresses Lakeway City Council during the Feb. 18 meeting. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
Lakeway to pursue restoration of 19th century cabin

As a historic cabin that in 2011 was relocated adjacent to City Hall continues to deteriorate, the Lakeway Heritage Committee has intervened with a request to conduct a due diligence study on the needs of the Liebelt Cabin that was built in 1869.

The city of Austin authorized the purchase of a Rodeway Inn at 2711 S. I-35 on Nov. 14. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)
No timeline set on opening of Austin’s first conversion of motel to homeless shelter

Austin City Council approved the purchase of the Rodeway Inn in November. City staff does not expect to close on the property until mid-April.

District 4 City Council Member Greg Casar (Christopher Neely/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin Council Member Greg Casar 'seriously considering' run for Kirk Watson’s state Senate seat

The 30-year-old Austin City Council member is serving the final year of his first full, four-year term.

Abed Yaghi makes a margherita pizza. (Sally Grace Holtgrieve/Community Impact Newspaper)
Yaghi's New York Pizzeria offering fresh yet affordable options since 1999

There are eight Yaghi's locations in the Austin area.

 Kido is set to open its first Austin location in the spring. (Courtesy Kido)
International preschool Kido set to open Austin location

Kido offers primary education through a researched curriculum focused on the nuances of human behavior

Bee Cave City Council Member Kara King (center) will take over as mayor of Bee Cave in May.
Kara King will be new mayor of Bee Cave

Since no one filed to run against King in the May general election, King will take over for Mayor Pro Tem Bill Goodwin, who has been running City Council meetings since former Mayor Monty Parker tendered his resignation Dec. 16.

Austin City Council is poised to make a final vote on the land development code rewrite by early April. (CHRISTOPHER NEELY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER)
Austin’s eight-year effort to rewrite land code advances to final vote with City Council's second-round approval

A majority of Austin City Council voted in favor of the land development code rewrite, setting the stage for a final vote on a project that has exhausted the community for roughly eight years.

Manduu opened in the Lakeway area Feb. 12. (Courtesy Manduu)
Manduu brings electrical muscle stimulation to Lakeway

Nashville-based fitness studio Manduu utilizes electric muscual stimulation in its strength training workouts.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in San Antonio on Feb. 13. The case is the 15th known COVID-19, commonly referred to in recent weeks as coronavirus, infection in the United States so far. (Courtesy Adobe stock photos)
The first coronavirus case in Texas was just confirmed. Here is what Austinites need to know about the virus

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in San Antonio this morning, according to a news release from the federal agency.

Back to top