Bee Cave City Council incumbents win re-election

Bee Cave voters went to the polls May 1 to re-elect three Bee Cave City Council members. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspapers)
Bee Cave voters went to the polls May 1 to re-elect three Bee Cave City Council members. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspapers)

Bee Cave voters went to the polls May 1 to re-elect three Bee Cave City Council members. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspapers)

Updated: 11:30 p.m.

Incumbents Andrew Clark, Kevin Hight and Andrea Willott May 1 defeated challengers Joann Taylor and Andrew Rebber. Clark won 655 votes, or 23.6%; Hight won 643 votes, or 23.1%, Willott won 639 votes, or 23%. In challenging these incumbents, Rebber won 477 votes, or 17.2%, and Taylor won 366 votes, or 13.2%.

Bee Cave's special election to reauthorize a local sales and use tax of one-eighth of 1% finished the night with 971 votes in favor and 156 votes against.

Voters also approved a set of eight propositions to update the Bee Cave city charter. Vote tallies are as follows:

Proposition A, amending the charter to remove duplicative sections: for 997; against 85;

Proposition B, amending the charter to ensure it complies with state law: for 990; against 93;

Proposition C, amending the charter to ensure the City Council holds sufficient meetings to ensure efficient conduct of business: for 960; against 144;

Proposition D, amending the charter to clarify City Council may request information and assistance from the city secretary: for 991; against 92;

Proposition E, amending the charter to provide a process for appointment, suspension and removal of the municipal judge: for 896; against 168;

Proposition F, amending the charter to authorize vacancies be filled by appointment or special election: for 914; against 173;

Proposition G, amending the charter to require the rule on abstentions apply to all city boards and commissions: for 898, against 144; and

Proposition H, amending the charter to clarify the mayor is a member of City Council: for 942, against 141.

Updated: 10:30 p.m.

Incumbents Andrew Clark, Kevin Hight and Andrea Willott are leading challengers Joann Taylor and Andrew Rebber. Clark has 525 votes, or 24%; Hight and Willott both have 510 votes, or 23.4%. Rebber has 356 votes, or 16.3%, and Taylor has 281 votes, or 12.9%.

Bee Cave's special election to reauthorize a local sales and use tax of one-eighth of 1% has 770 votes in favor and 112 votes against.

Voters are also considering a set of eight propositions to update the Bee Cave city charter. Current vote tallies are as follows:

Proposition A, amending the charter to remove duplicative sections: for 787; against 68;

Proposition B, amending the charter to ensure it complies with state law: for 787; against 68;

Proposition C, amending the charter to ensure the City Council holds sufficient meetings to ensure efficient conduct of business: for 758; against 108;

Proposition D, amending the charter to clarify City Council may request information and assistance from the city secretary: for 777; against 74;

Proposition E, amending the charter to provide a process for appointment, suspension and removal of the municipal judge: for 710; against 129;

Proposition F, amending the charter to authorize vacancies be filled by appointment or special election: for 727; against 126;

Proposition G, amending the charter to require the rule on abstentions apply to all city boards and commissions: for 714, against 110; and

Proposition H, amending the charter to clarify the mayor is a member of City Council: for 751, against 102.

ORIGINAL POST:

Three incumbents are up for re-election against a slate of challengers for three open seats on Bee Cave City Council.

With 104,677 early votes released at 7p.m., incumbent and Mayor Pro Tem Andrew Clark has 516 votes, or 24% of the total; incumbent Kevin Hight has 507 votes, or about 23.6%; incumbent Andrea Willott has 507 votes, or 23.6%. Challenger Andrew Rebber has 346 votes, or 16.1%; and Joann Taylor has 274 votes, or 12.7%.

To learn more about the candidates platforms, read the Q&A Community Impact Newspaper conducted with those running for office.

Bee Cave's special election to reauthorize a local sales and use tax of one-eighth of 1% has 757 votes in favor and 109 votes against.

Voters are also considering a set of eight propositions to update the Bee Cave city charter. Current vote tallies are as follows:

Proposition A, amending the charter to remove duplicative sections: for 773; against 61;

Proposition B, amending the charter to ensure it complies with state law: for 773; against 67;

Proposition C, amending the charter to ensure the City Council holds sufficient meetings to ensure efficient conduct of business: for 747; against 105;

Proposition D, amending the charter to clarify City Council may request information and assistance from the city secretary: for 764; against 73;

Proposition E, amending the charter to provide a process for appointment, suspension and removal of the municipal judge: for 701; against 124;

Proposition F, amending the charter to authorize vacancies be filled by appointment or special election: for 714; against 124;

Proposition G, amending the charter to require the rule on abstentions apply to all city boards and commissions: for 705, against 106; and

Proposition H, amending the charter to clarify the mayor is a member of City Council: for 739, against 99.

Results are updated as of 7:08 p.m. and are unofficial until they are canvassed and certified by the county clerk. Under Texas election law, the clerk accepts and counts mail-in ballots postmarked by election day and received by May 3 if they were sent from within the U.S., or May 6 if they were sent from outside the U.S.

Visit communityimpact.com/voter-guide/election-results to see results from all local elections in your community.


By Greg Perliski

Editor, Lake Travis/Westlake & Northwest Austin

Greg joined Community Impact as an editor in November 2020. In the communities he covers, Greg reports on local government, transportation, real estate development and business. He has written for newspapers, online publications and corporate communications teams. Greg earned a journalism degree from the University of Texas at Austin.