GALLERY: Sweetwater preschool teachers spread positivity through socially distant car parade

Teachers decorated their cars for a parade May 8. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Teachers decorated their cars for a parade May 8. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Teachers decorated their cars for a parade May 8. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Teachers decorated their cars for a parade May 8. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Image description
Teachers decorated their cars for a parade May 8. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Image description
Teachers decorated their cars for a parade May 8. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact Newspaper)

The sounds of music and car horns filled the streets of western Travis County’s Sweetwater development on Friday morning as teachers at the local preschool KLA Schools of Sweetwater took to their decorated vehicles to join in a car parade for students and families.


As with independent school districts, preschools throughout the state closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with KLA Schools of Sweetwater anticipating a June 1 opening date.

KLA Schools of Sweetwater first opened to students in February, serving children from two months old through prekindergarten, with camps available for kids ages 6-12.

The child care and preschool facility implemented a remote learning platform; however, staying connected to students can be a challenge given the limitations, according to School Director Margaret Dickerson.


Dickerson said she was inspired by stories of schools and communities spreading positivity while maintaining social distancing through car parades.

“We want to let the community know we’re here, and we’re thinking of them,” Dickerson said. “What’s more fun than a parade?”


Families and students remained on their properties as teachers passed by as a way to maintain a safe distance.

Owner Sanam Madampath hosted the parade from the back of a vehicle, tossing premade gift bags and acting as the event’s master of ceremonies.

“Teachers are highly relational folks. Doing e-learning and being quarantined in their homes is really difficult for teachers who rely on that human connection to really fill their cup,” Dickerson said.
By Amy Rae Dadamo
Amy Rae Dadamo is the reporter for Lake Travis-Westlake, where her work focuses on city government and education. Originally from New Jersey, Amy Rae relocated to Austin after graduating from Ramapo College of New Jersey in May 2019.