PeaceBox mobile meditation room seeks to deliver calm

Stacy Thrash, founder of PeaceBox, sits with one of her two mobile meditation studios that travel to schools, businesses and events in the Greater Austin area.

Stacy Thrash, founder of PeaceBox, sits with one of her two mobile meditation studios that travel to schools, businesses and events in the Greater Austin area.

Image description
Stacy Thrash, founder of PeaceBox, sits with one of her two mobile meditation studios that travel to schools, businesses and events in the Greater Austin area.
Image description
Thrash guides people through meditation and helps them learn how to be more present. She also offers training programs for others who want to lead mindfulness practices.
Image description
Thrash teaches there is freedom in knowing it is completely in your control where you put your attention, and mindfulness meets you where you are.
Mindfulness meditation is about training to focus your attention where you want it, Stacy Thrash said. She is using a renovated shipping container to help people learn how to do just that.

Thrash founded PeaceBox, a mobile meditation studio, in 2017. She currently has two units—one is located in the Lake Travis area for retreats and weekend classes, and the other is on a permanent trailer so it can travel to schools, corporations and community events.

As mindfulness becomes more popular, PeaceBox will grow, Thrash said, adding that she plans to offer a rental option of the PeaceBox studio for any group looking for an intimate and dedicated venue for ongoing practice. There will be the option of having an instructor on-site or a variety of recorded practices to choose from—headsets included.

There are many misconceptions that keep people from even trying meditation as a mindfulness practice, Thrash said. The most common is that the goal is to stop thoughts completely. “It’s not about stopping the mind at all,” she said. “It’s about training the mind to focus where you want your attention.”

For example, next time you are sitting in traffic, notice where you put your attention, Thrash said. “The environment itself is somewhat outside of your control, which causes stress,” she said.

“If I choose to put my attention on something that I do have control over, such as my breath or noticing nearby restaurants, then my stress response goes down, and I feel more at peace.”

Different people experience stress differently, Thrash said. There tend to be four places where people place their attention.

“Anxiety is usually an indication your attention is in the future,” she said. “Depression and grief [are] an indication your attention is in the past. If you’re frustrated or angry or feeling unsettled, usually your attention is on other people and wanting them to do something different.”

But you cannot have control over any of the above, only [the fourth place] the present moment, Thrash said. She said a person can learn to identify where their attention is and realize they have a choice about how they react. “Once you learn this tool, you can’t unlearn it,” she said.

Highlights from the mobile PeaceBox’s travel log

• 2018 South by Southwest Wellness Expo

• Book People—downtown Austin

• Whole Foods—downtown Austin

• The University of Texas

• Texas Nursing Association

• Hyatt—downtown Austin

• City of Austin Wellness Expo

• City of Bastrop Wellness Expo

 
By Sally Grace Holtgrieve
Sally Grace Holtgrieve solidified her passion for news during her time as Editor-in-Chief of Christopher Newport University's student newspaper, The Captain's Log. She started her professional career at The Virginia Gazette and moved to Texas in 2015 to cover government and politics at The Temple Daily Telegram. She started working at Community Impact Newspaper in February 2018 as the Lake Travis-Westlake reporter and moved into the role of Georgetown editor in June 2019.


MOST RECENT

The Woods of Westlake homeowners association has reported public intoxication and other safety hazards at its Barton Creek Greenbelt trailhead. (Amy Rae Dadamo/Community Impact)
Public access maintained at the Woods of Westlake greenbelt; paid parking could be enacted

Visitors utilizing the Barton Creek Greenbelt entry point on Scottish Woods Trail will soon notice several policy changes following reports of hazardous behavior by surrounding Woods of Westlake residents.

Dr. Steven Kelder is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health in Austin with a career spanning more than 25 years. (Graphic by Chance Flowers/Community Impact Newspaper)
Disease expert discusses ongoing pandemic and nearing school year

Dr. Steven H. Kelder recently answered several questions for Community Impact Newspaper regarding COVID-19; trends in cases statewide; and important considerations for parents, students and educators as the 2020-21 school year approaches.

A graphic that reads "today's coronavirus updates"
Travis County coronavirus indicators still hovering at upper end of Stage 4 risk

Travis County saw 657 new cases and 68 new hospitalizions July 13.

The city said residents should make sure they are only watering on their scheduled days based on address. (Courtesy city of Georgetown)
Georgetown faces watering restrictions, SW Austin private school closes: News from Central Texas

Read the latest business and community news from Central Texas here.

In Rollingwood, officials are pursuing the creation of the city's first-ever comprehensive plan. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
Rollingwood pursuing city's first-ever comprehensive plan

Citing sustained growth and a need to manage development, the city of Rollingwood is pursuing the creation of its first comprehensive plan.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, shown here in March, announced July 13 the U.S. Department of Defense would provide additional resource to help Texas combat COVID-19. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
Department of Defense task forces deployed to help Texas combat COVID-19

Gov. Greg Abbott announced July 13 the U.S. Department of Defense would provide more resources to Texas to combat the rise of COVID-19.

The proposed fiscal year 2020-21 budget includes an $11.3 million reduction in police spending, achieved largely by eliminating 100 vacant positions within the Austin Police Department. (Design by Shelby Savage/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin's $4.2 billion proposed budget includes 2.5% reduction to police department funding

Community groups and some Austin City Council members have called for a police department budget reduction of at least $100 million.

Of the 14,788 COVID-19 cases, 754 originate from the Lake Travis-Westlake area, which encompasses nine ZIP codes in western Travis County. (Brian Rash/Community Impact Newspaper)
See how COVID-19 cases have grown in the Lake Travis-Westlake area since last week

Of the 14,788 COVID-19 cases, 754 originate from the Lake Travis-Westlake area, which encompasses nine ZIP codes in western Travis County.

Thousands marched from Huston-Tillotson University to the Texas Capitol on June 7 to protest police brutality and systemic racism. (Christopher Neely/Community Impact Newspaper)
Where Austin's mayor, 9 City Council members stand on police reform, funding, leadership

With decisions coming soon on the city's fiscal year 2020-21 budget, all but one City Council member sat down for interviews on where they stand on various policing issues in Austin.

Photo illustration by Amy Rae Dadamo, Jay Jones/Community Impact Newspaper
Residents, leaders in Lake Travis-Westlake work to update policy, enact change

From student-run campaigns to community-organized Black Lives Matter protests, residents and officials throughout western Travis County are responding to the evolving socio-political movement.

Travis County has added 3,069 new confirmed cases over the past week from July 6-12. (Community Impact Staff)
Travis County adds 3,069 new coronavirus cases over past week

Travis County has added 3,069 new confirmed cases over the past week from July 6-12.

A sign directs voters inside Ridgetop Elementary School in North Central Austin. (Jack Flagler/Community Impact Newspaper)
11.8% of voters in Travis County have voted early since June 29, exceeding 2018 primary numbers

More than 97,000 Travis County residents have voted in person or by mail. The turnout far surpassed the combined early and Election Day totals in the 2018 primary run-off election.