RideAustin shuts down operations

RideAustin announced June 12 it will end operations after four years in the city. (John Cox/Community Impact Newspaper)
RideAustin announced June 12 it will end operations after four years in the city. (John Cox/Community Impact Newspaper)

RideAustin announced June 12 it will end operations after four years in the city. (John Cox/Community Impact Newspaper)

Local ride-sharing nonprofit RideAustin will be discontinuing its operations, according to a June 12 email sent to users.

“While we are sad to be closing our doors—it’s amazing to see how much of a difference we have made together in the Austin community,” read the email.

The service allowed users to round their fare up to give to local charities. According to RideAustin, that led to $450,000 in donations over the service’s four years in Austin. RideAustin said users took 3 million rides, and $38 million was paid to drivers.

The service began in 2016 following the exit of Uber and Lyft from Austin due to a legal battle between the city and the ride-share giants over municipal rules requiring drivers to undergo fingerprint background checks.

The following year, those companies returned to the city when Gov. Greg Abbott signed a bill establishing state regulations that overruled Austin’s local ordinances.


Other ride-hailing companies that entered the market in 2016 have also since suspended their operations in Austin. Fasten ceased its U.S. operations in 2018, and Fare closed in June 2017.
By Jack Flagler
Jack is the editor of Community Impact Newspaper's Central Austin and Southwest Austin editions. He began his career as a sports reporter in Massachusetts and North Carolina before moving to Austin in 2018. He grew up in Maine and graduated from Boston University, but prefers tacos al pastor to lobster rolls. You can get in touch at jflagler@communityimpact.com


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