Sam Biscoe officially approved as interim Travis County judge following Sarah Eckhardt's resignation

A photo of the Travis County Commissioners Court
Former Travis County Judge Sam Biscoe (center back row) has been identified as Sarah Eckhardt's temporary replacement. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

Former Travis County Judge Sam Biscoe (center back row) has been identified as Sarah Eckhardt's temporary replacement. (Olivia Aldridge/Community Impact Newspaper)

The official bond to hire former Travis County Judge Sam Biscoe was approved in a unanimous vote of the Travis County Commissioners Court on March 12, following the March 10 announcement that Travis County Judge Sarah Eckhardt would step down to pursue a seat in the Texas Senate.

Biscoe—who served as Travis County judge from 1998-2014—will serve as Eckhardt’s temporary replacement until November, when an official successor is expected to be elected. The bond outlines Biscoe’s position with a term that runs through Nov. 30.


Eckhardt’s work on the court has not yet officially ended despite the acceptance of her official resignation and the approval of the bond. Per state law, Eckhardt will remain in her position until Biscoe is officially sworn in, an event Eckhardt said was tentatively scheduled to occur March 23.

The current judge’s exit allows her to vie for retiring state Sen. Kirk Watson’s seat in a projected May 2 election, as Texas state law requires candidates not to hold another lucrative public office while running. She will compete with state Rep. Eddie Rodriguez for the position and possibly Austin City Council Member Greg Casar, who has filed initial paperwork for his candidacy.
By Olivia Aldridge

Multi-Platform Journalist

Olivia hosts and produces Community Impact Newspaper's podcasts, The Austin Breakdown, The Houston Breakdown and The DFW Breakdown. She launched the podcasts after nearly three years as a reporter for the newspaper, covering public health, business, development and Travis County government for the Central Austin edition. Olivia worked as a reporter and producer for South Carolina Public Radio before moving to Texas.