Leander tops Census Bureau list of fastest-growing large U.S. cities from 2018-19

From 2018-19, Leander was the fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to data released May 21 by the U.S. Census Bureau. (Courtesy U.S. Census Bureau)
From 2018-19, Leander was the fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to data released May 21 by the U.S. Census Bureau. (Courtesy U.S. Census Bureau)

From 2018-19, Leander was the fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to data released May 21 by the U.S. Census Bureau. (Courtesy U.S. Census Bureau)

From 2018-19, Leander was the fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to data made public late May 20 by the U.S. Census Bureau.

From July 1, 2018, to July 1, 2019, Leander’s population grew by 12% to 62,208 residents, according to census data.

Bridget Brandt, president and CEO of the Leander Chamber of Commerce, listed several reasons for Leander's list-topping growth.

"Because Leander is simply amazing," she said. "We have a great cost of living, an incredible variety of home options, an amazing school district, incredible health care and Hill Country views. It really can’t be beat."

Leander was joined in the top 10 fastest-growing large cities in the U.S. during 2018-19 by two other Texas cities: Georgetown, which was seventh, and New Braunfels, which was ninth.


In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated Leander’s population to be 27,288.

Brandt expects Leander's fast growth to continue.

"We are really working on creating unique aspects of the business districts in Leander," she said. "In the future, you will have the opportunity to visit Old Town that features unique boutiques, the farmers market and dining options; to the good vibes of downtown in Northline; to the numerous breweries and distilleries growing along Hero Way."

The U.S. Census defines large cities as having 50,000 or more residents.

To the south, Cedar Park from 2010-19 was the seventh-fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to census data.
By Brian Perdue
Brian Perdue is the editor of the Lake Travis-Westlake and Northwest Austin editions of Community Impact Newspaper. A native of Virginia's Appalachian Mountains, he has been a journalist since 1992, living and working in Virginia, Washington D.C., Hawaii's Big Island, Southern California and Florida before moving to Austin in 2019.


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