Election Q&A: Shenandoah City Council, Position 3

Early voting runs April 19-27 for the May 1 election. (Graphic by Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Early voting runs April 19-27 for the May 1 election. (Graphic by Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Early voting runs April 19-27 for the May 1 election. (Graphic by Community Impact Newspaper staff)



HOUSTON



Shenandoah City Council, Position 3










Jon Samuelson



Occupation: retired


Experience: finance, government accounting, treasurer

Contact: [email protected]

www.facebook.com/jon-samuelson-for-shenandoah-109902081185534




How do you think the city should approach developing the remaining land in Shenandoah?



JS: As a City Council man, I would approach the remaining land sensibly and methodically. Keeping the city of Shenandoah as a desirable small city to live and visit while maximizing the sales tax revenue in the commercial areas would be one of my top priorities. With limited remaining land within the city limits, that also means promoting redevelopment and renovations as appropriate.



What would be your priorities as a member of City Council?



JS: My top priority would be representing all residents of Shenandoah. In addition, resident safety and providing a high level of city services for our residents, visitors and businesses would be a priority. Protecting our low tax rate while promoting financial responsibility through thorough analysis of spending variances. Additionally, improving mobility, protecting our roadways and not allowing them to be major thoroughfares for others.



What experience qualifies you to be a member of City Council?



JS: I was known as the “best problem solver” by my longtime boss. I believe I am smart, have good common sense, am open minded and willing to work for the betterment of Shenandoah. Expertise in management consulting, financials, business processes would add value to the city and its residents. I ask the citizens of Shenandoah to vote ... on my qualifications to solve future complex issues and provide financial oversight to the city of Shenandoah.









John Escoto



Occupation: retired law enforcement, 32 years


Experience: Shenandoah Planning and Zoning Commission, 10-year resident

Contact: www.jescotoforshenandoah.com




How do you think the city should approach developing the remaining land in Shenandoah?

JE: I am a member of the planning and zoning commission. We have just [approved] the amendments to the 2010 city of Shenandoah comprehensive plan. These amendments will be forwarded to the City Council for final approval or disapproval for adaptation. The comprehensive plan allows a municipality to inform long-range development by stating community goals for future physical development and can be a source providing consistency and a basis for development and land use regulations.

What would be your priorities as a member of City Council?



JE: With the increase of six new subdivisions since I moved to Shenandoah, I have seen an increase in traffic congestion, especially at key intersections. It is my goal to work with fellow council members, city administrator, city engineer and public works director in resolving this problem. I plan to ensure that our electrical power provider upgrades aging power lines and transformers to ensure consistent and reliable power. Frequent power outages have been a problem in the last five years.

What experience qualifies you to be a member of City Council?


JE: First of all, I am a 10-year resident of Shenandoah. I have kept up with how the city has been and is presently run. I attend City Council sessions, and when I can’t I watch them online. I keep up with ongoing and future projects through my close relationships with current council members and staff. I have experience in collective deliberation and decision-making processes. I have supervised multimillion-dollar budgets.




By Andrew Christman
Andrew joined Community Impact Newspaper in early 2019 after moving from Indiana. He is a 2015 graduate from Indiana State University, where he received degrees in English and journalism. He has written for a number of small town publications throughout his career as a reporter.


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