Q&A: Judy Barrick and David Springer face off in Volente mayoral race

Judy Barrick (left) and David Springer are running for the position of mayor of Volente.

Judy Barrick (left) and David Springer are running for the position of mayor of Volente.

Residents of the village of Volente will elect a new mayor and two council members Nov. 6.

Jana Nace and incumbent Carol “Missy” Thost are unopposed for seats on council, according to Travis County’s city sample ballot.

Two candidates—Judy Barrick and David Springer—face off in the Volente mayoral race. They submitted questions to a Q&A via email. Responses may have been edited for grammar, clarity or space.

Learn more about local elections at www.communityimpact.com/vote.




Name: Judy Barrick


Occupation: I’ve been a business owner in Austin for 31 years. Celebrate Austin is my company and is the hard-bound annual visitors, newcomers and locals publication in over 31,786 hotel, motel and resort rooms in Austin and the Hill Country.

Top priorities: To open the lines of communication between residents, businesses and the mayor and City Council to keep our neighborhoods a safe place to live, work and play. As mayor I would strive to meet the needs of all residents who choose to call Volente home.

What do you think are the three biggest issues facing Volente?
Three biggest issues currently in our village are our water supply, updating our comprehensive plan and site development and updating our website to get all of our building applications and permits on it. Living on the lake we are surrounding by water and yet do not have treated water. During drought times residents’ wells went dry. The Brushy Creek Regional Utility Authority is a partnership with Leander, Cedar Park and Round Rock to design and construct a regional water system that will supply treated water to those three communities in our village. As you can see, Volente is not included.

How do you propose to fix them?
My hope would be that we would be able to work out an agreement to tie into the treated water plant or the system since they are building it in our community which will affect us forever! No reason we cannot become a partner with the other three cities. Trust me, I know all of that comes with a price and this is something that residents cannot afford.

I would like to build trust between residents and the city by actively going back to setting up committees for all of our departments and get the residents involved to provide recommendations.







Name: David Springer


Occupation: retired computer systems analyst, Dell Computer

Top priorities: roads, future development, transparency

Campaign website: www.springerformayor.com

What do you think are the three biggest issues facing Volente?
1) Roads—with the booming economy pavers have more business than they can handle. Our location and small size put us at the bottom of their list. They'll do it but for 2-3x the cost we paid just last year.

2) Future Development—Volente Peak PDD becoming [a] nature preserve instead of 300 homes changes our situation dramatically. Roughly 150 1-acre undeveloped homesites remain. Do we want a larger population?

3) Transparency—what I hear a lot from people who urged me to run for mayor is a lack of transparency in the current administration.

How do you propose to fix them?
Development fix: Ask citizens if they want higher density development or rural atmosphere. Continue status quo zoning for rural.

Roads fix: Pursue interlocal agreement with Travis County so they resume caring for our roads again.

Transparency fix: A) limit executive sessions; B) give public more than three days’ notice of council meetings; C) restore the Texas Open Meetings Act-compliant message board D) podcast City Council meetings; [and] E) start meetings later to accommodate commuters.


By Abby Bora
Abby Bora started at Community Impact Newspaper in May 2017. After working as a reporter, she became editor of the Cedar Park-Leander edition in October 2018. She covers Leander ISD and city government. Bora graduated from Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I. with a bachelor’s degree in media and communications studies.


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