Arizona, Maricopa County officials combat election misinformation as ballot tabulation continues statewide

Misinformation on ballot tabulation sparked a fire on social media this week, which culminated in a protest outside Maricopa County Election headquarters in downtown Phoenix late Nov. 4. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Misinformation on ballot tabulation sparked a fire on social media this week, which culminated in a protest outside Maricopa County Election headquarters in downtown Phoenix late Nov. 4. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Misinformation on ballot tabulation sparked a fire on social media this week, which culminated in a protest outside Maricopa County Election headquarters in downtown Phoenix late Nov. 4. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Misinformation on ballot tabulation sparked a fire on social media this week, which culminated in a protest outside Maricopa County Election ballot processing center late Nov. 4.

Maricopa County elections officials announced just after midnight Nov. 5 that about 275,000 ballots remain and that more results are expected at 7 p.m. Nov. 5. As of the latest ballot tabulation, there had been 1.79 million ballots cast and counted: 912,585 ballots for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and 838,071 ballots for President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. Biden continues to lead the race statewide as of Nov. 5, with 50.49% of the vote; Trump is trailing slightly behind, with 48.14% of the vote.

Clint Hickman, chair of the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors, sent a letter to county voters Nov. 4 that said the board of supervisors was "concerned about the misinformation spreading about the integrity of our elections."

"First, vote counting is not a Republican or Democrat issue; everyone should want all the votes to be counted, whether they were mailed or cast in person," read the letter. "An accurate vote takes time. It's possible the results you see now may change after all the votes are counted. This is evidence of democracy, not fraud."

Hickman, Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes and Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs all debunked misinformation on social media regarding the use of Sharpies on ballots after Maricopa County provided Sharpies to voters; this was intended to keep ink from smudging as ballots are counted on-site.


Hobbs tweeted answers to commonly asked election questions Nov. 4 and addressed the question of Sharpies on ballots invalidating ballots.

"New offset columns on the Maricopa ballots mean bleed-through won't impact processing," Hobbs said; she further noted that counties may differ due to different tabulating processes or equipment. "If you followed your county's instructions, your vote will count, whether you used a Sharpie or other pen. The type of pen you use will not cancel or invalidate your vote."

Hobbs also addressed an issue some voters were reporting about the apparent "cancellation" of ballots when they looked to see if their ballot was counted.

"Voters who received an early ballot in the mail but chose to instead vote in-person will see their early ballot status as 'Canceled' on their Ballot-by-Mail/Early Ballot Status update," Hobbs tweeted. "This is because the early ballot is canceled so the ballot cast-in person can be counted. Seeing a 'Canceled' early ballot status does not mean the in-person ballot you cast was not counted. If you voted a provisional ballot, your ballot will be counted once the county confirms your registration status and that you did not cast another ballot."

The latest Chandler, Gilbert and Maricopa County elections results are available here.


MOST RECENT

The city of Chandler headquarters is in downtown Chandler. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Chandler ends emergency declaration issued last March due to COVID-19

Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke announced May 13 that he is rescinding the proclamation declaring the existence of a local emergency in Chandler issued March 19, 2020, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Gilbert home values rising fast in 85298; 5 businesses coming to Chandler and more top area news

Read the top news from the past week from the Gilbert and Chandler areas.

Doug Ducey
Ducey unveils program to encourage individuals to return to work

Gov. Doug Ducey announced May 13 a three-part “Arizona Back to Work” program to incentivize residents to get off unemployment benefits and fill one of the state’s 160,000 to 180,000 open jobs.

masks
CDC ends all mask requirements for fully vaccinated people

The guidance states fully vaccinated people do not need to wear masks indoors or outdoors.

Doug Ducey
Gov. Ducey signs bill to trim early voter roll

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey on May 11 signed into law Senate Bill 1485, which will purge the permanent early voter rolls of anyone who has not voted by mail in the previous two election cycles.

Denise McCreery, d'vine Gourmet owner, first began her business as a means to rid her home of half-consumed wine bottles her husband, a wine distributor, brought home. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Chandler's d'Vine Gourmet set to relocate to downtown this fall

Downtown Chandler will get a new business this fall when d'Vine Gourmet relocates its store to the space occupied by Sibley's West.

Residents will have until May 2023 to obtain a Real ID. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
US Department of Homeland Security extends Real ID deadline until 2023

Drivers will have until May 2023 to get the Real ID, which will be required for adults boarding a U.S. commercial flight.

COVID-19 vaccine
Arizona children ages 12-15 can be vaccinated starting May 13

Arizona Department of Health Services officials said they are ready to administer vaccines to the state’s 400,000 children in that age group at state-run vaccination sites in the Phoenix metropolitan area, Tucson, Yuma and Flagstaff.

Susan Bailey was elected president of the American Medical Association in June 2020. (Courtesy American Medical Association)
'I am convinced we will beat COVID': American Medical Association President Susan Bailey discusses vaccine successes, myths, challenges

Bailey was elected president of the American Medical Association in June 2020. Much of the organization's focus during that time has been on vaccine transparency and distribution.

Several new businesses will be opening in Chandler in the next few months. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Conveyor belt sushi, wine bar and more: 5 businesses coming soon to Chandler

Several businesses will open in Chandler in the coming months including 99 Ranch Market, a revolving sushi bar and others.

Chandler USD headquarters. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Chandler USD governing board to discuss COVID-19 mitigation plan for upcoming year at May 12 meeting

The Chandler USD governing board will discuss the district's potential COVID-19 mitigation plan for the 2021-22 school year during a meeting Wednesday, May 12, according to the board agenda.

Here are the coronavirus hospitalization data updates to know across Arizona. (Community Impact staff)
ADHS: Emergency Department visits for COVID-19 symptoms spike May 12

Take a look at the hospitalization data across Arizona.