Burst of Butterflies allows customers to play with the arts and get creative

Cheryl Tisland is the owner of Burst of Butterflies in downtown Chandler. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)
Cheryl Tisland is the owner of Burst of Butterflies in downtown Chandler. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Cheryl Tisland is the owner of Burst of Butterflies in downtown Chandler. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Cheryl Tisland said the name of her family’s business—Burst of Butterflies—fit their situation perfectly when they came up with it in 2013.

Her sister had been in an accident and suffered a brain injury—sometimes called a burst of butterflies. A burst of butterflies can also describe the feeling a person gets when they are excited for something. Tisland and her mother had just retired to care for her sister and were dreaming up a business that would blend their love of art and family. It seemed kismet that the family business be named after that excited feeling and the injury that served as a catalyst for starting Burst of Butterflies, Tisland said.

“We all love art, and we wanted to create a space that was more than just a place for parties; we wanted our business to really focus on the arts,” Tisland said.

Burst of Butterflies debuted in downtown Chandler in 2015. The business offers customers a place to get creative with different mediums.

“Growing up, my mom painted and did all kinds of crafts,” Tisland said. “She taught me how to crochet and do macrame. For Christmas, I would get just a big bag of miscellaneous crafts.”


Tisland said the business, like so many others, was struck down during its peak season this year due to the coronavirus. The family closed the doors for two months, between March and May, and decided to give the interior of the business a makeover with their time. In May, Tisland said they began offering take-home projects for people. They now offer more than 300 options for people to take home if they are uncomfortable coming into the studio—which is spaced for social distancing, and masks are required.

But it has been difficult for the business, Tisland said. They closed the Tempe location that had been open only a year. Still, Tisland is hopeful that the Chandler business will continue to be a creative outlet for the community and be a place where people come and “it feels like family.”“This is a stressful time, and art makes such great therapy,” Tisland said. “We are trying to keep everybody creative.”