UPDATED: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee rises to more than 2,200

There are now over 2,200 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Tennessee, according to state health officials.  (Rendering courtesy Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
There are now over 2,200 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Tennessee, according to state health officials. (Rendering courtesy Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

There are now over 2,200 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Tennessee, according to state health officials. (Rendering courtesy Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 31

Cases of coronavirus across the state have risen to at least 2,239, according to the Tennessee Department of Health.

This is an increase of 405 cases from yesterday, the largest daily increase yet, according to past data from the TDH.

More than 27,000 tests have been conducted statewide, and Tennessee has seen 23 deaths and 175 hospitalizations since the beginning of the outbreak, according to the TDH.

Updated 2:10 March 30: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee rises to 1,834, nearly 300 more cases since yesterday

Tennessee now has at least 1,834 total cases of coronavirus, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Health. That number is increase of nearly 300 new cases since yesterday. This morning, officials with Metro Nashville announced that Davidson County now has 443 confirmed cases, including three deaths and 80 recovered cases. According to the TDH, Williamson County has 111 cases, up 10 since yesterday. More than 23,000 tests have been performed, according to the TDH. Updated 2:20 March 29: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee now at 1,537


Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee has risen to at least 1,537, according to the latest update from the Tennessee Department of Health. More than 20,000 tests have been conducted across the state, and adults ages 21-30 make up the largest age range with confirmed cases at 390. According to officials with Metro Nashville, Davidson County has 394 confirmed cases, with 80 of those individuals having recovered. Williamson County now has 101 cases, according to the TDH.

Updated 2:15 p.m. March 28: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee now over 1,300

The number of cases of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, has risen to 1,373, according to totals released March 28 by the Tennessee Department of Health. TDH totals show cases in Shelby County have surpassed the number in Davidson County with 269 cases.

According to the TDH, Davidson County has at least 243 cases, however that number varies from Metro Nashville's daily total of 376 total cases.

TDH officials have said there are multiple reasons for the differences in totals, such as if the total is reported by the county where the person was tested or by where they live, or it can vary based on how quickly confirmed cases are reported to the state.

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 27: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee rise to at least 1,200

Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee have risen to 1,203, according to the latest numbers from the Tennessee Department of Health. Davidson County has more than 200, and Williamson County has 91.

As has been the case over the last few days, case estimates from Metro Nashville have been much higher than those released by the state. According to a press conference this morning with Metro Nashville Mayor John Copper, Davidson County has 312 cases confirmed. Of those cases, 55 have recovered and two have died.

More than 16,000 tests for the virus have been conducted across the state, using a combination of stat and privately-owned labs, according to the TDH. Updated 2:08 p.m. March 26: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee now over 900

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 26 the number of cases of coronavirus in the state has risen to 957, up from 784 yesterday, an increase of 173 cases. More than 200 cases are in Davidson County and 70 cases are in Williamson County, however TDH Commissioner Dr. Lisa Piercy said in a March 25 press conference that the TDH is experiencing some lag times in reporting in some areas of the state, which can lead to differences in reporting. This morning, Mayor John Cooper's office announced Nashville has closer to 300 cases. Updated 2:10 p.m. March 25: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee rises to 784

The number of coronavirus cases across the state has risen to at least 784, which is 117 more cases than yesterday, according to the latest update from the Tennessee Department of Health. Davidson County still has the highest number of cases at 188, up five from yesterday. While this may seem like a slow down in the number of new cases, Dr. Alex Jahangir, chair of the Metropolitan Board of Health and Metro Coronavirus Task Force, said in a press conference this morning he does not believe this means cases are slowing down.

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 24: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee rises to 667

Cases of coronavirus are up to 667 statewide as of March 24, up 52 cases from yesterday, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. In Davidson County, at least 183 cases have been confirmed, according to TDH data. However, according to an announcement this morning from Metro Nashville, that number could be as high as 253. Because some facilities report cases based on where the sample was collected versus the person's county of residence, numbers can vary as it takes time to reconcile total cases, according to Bill Christian, associate director for the TDH office of communications and media relations. Williamson County has the third-highest number of cases in the state at 64 confirmed cases, which is 11 more than yesterday.

Updated 3:05 p.m. March 23: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee up to 615

The number of cases of coronavirus is now 615, according to a March 23 update from the Tennessee Department of Health. This is 110 new cases since yesterday, March 22. According to an announcement from the TDH, new tracking processes have been recently implemented, which has led to lower figures in some counties. In Davidson County, cases total 164 according to the TDH, however officials with Metro Nashville announced earlier today that the county has 184 confirmed cases, including 27 that have recovered from the virus. Williamson County has 53 cases, five more since yesterday.

Updated 2:05 p.m. March 22: Cases of coronavirus across the state rises to 505

Cases of coronavirus in the state have risen to 505, according to the latest update from the Tennessee Department of Health. This is 134 new cases since yesterday afternoon, according to the TDH. Nashville still has the most cases at 167, however Shelby County has surpassed Williamson County to have the second-highest number of cases at 66. Williamson County has 48 cases, which is only one more than yesterday. At least 40 other counties in the state have confirmed cases.

Updated 2:01 p.m. March 21: 371 cases of coronavirus confirmed in Tennessee, more than 140 new cases since yesterday

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 21 the number of cases of coronavirus in the state has risen to 371, up by 143 cases since yesterday. The highest number of cases is still in Nashville, with 140 cases. Williamson County has the second highest number of cases at 47 and Shelby County has 40 cases.

The TDH announced March 21 it has added a second call center line for residents who have questions about the virus. The line can be reached at 833-556-2476.

Updated 2:01 p.m. March 20: 228 cases of coronavirus confirmed in Tennessee, more than 100 cases found in Nashville

At least 228 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in Tennessee, according to the latest announcement from the Tennessee Department of Health. Just over 100 of those cases are in Davidson County, with Williamson County having the second-highest number at 35 cases. Cases have been confirmed in 26 counties across the state.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 19: Over 150 cases of coronavirus confirmed in Tennessee

The total number of COVID-19 cases have risen to 154 in Tennessee, with 75 reported in Davidson County, 30 in Williamson County and the rest spread across numerous other counties in the state. The total number of cases increased by 56 from yesterday's report by the Tennessee Department of Health. For a look at the timeline of events in Tennessee as it relates to the novel coronavirus, view our additional coverage here.

Updated 2:04 p.m. March 18: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee rises to 98, with more than half in Nashville

Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee have risen to 98 statewide, with more than half of all cases confirmed in Nashville, according to the Tennessee Department of Health. There are 58 confirmed cases in Davidson County and 24 cases in Williamson County. The total number of cases has risen from 39 cases on Sunday. A small number of cases have now been confirmed in 13 counties across the state, including four in Shelby County and two each in Knox and Sumner counties.

Updated 2:03 p.m. March 17: UPDATED: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee at 73, cases in Davidson County rise by more than 60% overnight

The number of cases of coronavirus in Tennessee has risen to 73 confirmed cases, according to officials with the Tennessee Department of Health. There are now 42 cases in Davidson County, up from 25 yesterday. Williamson County has the second highest number of cases at 21.

The age range with the highest number of cases is those from ages 18-49, according to the TDH.

Many restaurants and businesses have closed or switched to delivery or pick up models as a way to increase social distancing and reduce the spread of the virus. Schools in the area are closed through at least the end of the month as local officials are calling for individuals to avoid groups of 50 people or more, or in some cases, groups of 10 or more.

Updated 2:10 p.m. March 16: UPDATED: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee climbs to 52, with more than 80% of cases in Davidson and Williamson counties

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Health announced March 16 the number of cases of coronavirus statewide has climbed to 52. More than 80% of these cases at in Davidson and and Williamson counties, which have 25 and 18 confirmed cases, respectively.

Gov. Bill Lee has declared a state of emergency and announced March 16 he is asking schools statewide to close until the end of the month. Officials in both counties are encouraging social distancing and are urging the community to cancel any events with more than 50 people in attendance, per guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control.

Updated 2 p.m. March 15: UPDATED: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee up to 39, majority of cases in Davidson and Williamson counties

Confirmed coronavirus cases in the state of Tennessee have climbed to 39 statewide, according to the Tennessee Department of Health.

The total number of cases includes 17 in Davidson County and 14 in Williamson County as well as a small number of cases in seven additional counties across the state, according to TDH.

Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper is encouraging social distancing as a measure to limit the spread of the virus.

“As my administration works with state and federal officials and community partners to respond to the coronavirus in Nashville and Davidson County, I encourage everyone to take necessary precautions to prevent person-to-person spread," Cooper said in a statement. "This includes postponing large public and private gatherings, encouraging teleconferencing and remote working, and taking all necessary precautions to protect employees, congregants, students, and all Nashvillians–especially our medically fragile residents."

Schools in the area will be closed this week for spring break, and multiple venues across the area, such as the Country Music Hall of Fame, Bridgestone Arena and more, are closed through at least the end of the month.

Updated 2:20 p.m. March 13: UPDATED: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee climbs to 26

The number of confirmed and presumptive positive cases of coronavirus, or COVID-19, has increased to 26 cases statewide, according to a March 13 update from the Tennessee Department of Health.

According to the TDH, there are now 10 cases in Davidson County and nine cases in Williamson County. In addition to two cases in Shelby County, one case in Knox County and one case in Sullivan County—all of which had been previously reported by state health officials—the TDH now reports one case each in Hamilton, Jefferson and Rutherford counties.

On March 12, Gov. Bill Lee declared a state of emergency in Tennessee due to the increasing number of coronavirus cases. Lee said he signed the executive order as a way to request funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to combat the spread of the virus.

The Tennessee State Public Health Laboratory has completed 129 tests for the virus, up from 88 on March 12, with 13 confirmed positive. The other 13 positive cases have been reported from commercial and private laboratories in the state.

The cases confirmed by the TDH include both confirmed and presumptive positive cases. The department releases the updated numbers of statewide cases daily at 2 p.m.

For more information about the virus, visit www.tn.gov/health or contact the TDH’s public information line at 877-857-2945 open daily from 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

Updated 2:30 p.m. March 12: Coronavirus cases in Tennessee double, bringing total to 18

Recorded cases of coronavirus, or COVID-19, doubled overnight from nine to 18, according to a March 12 2 p.m. update from the Tennessee Department of Health.

According to the TDH, there are now eight cases in Williamson County, six cases in Davidson County, one case in Knox County, one case in Sullivan County and two cases in Shelby County.

The update comes just hours after Gov. Bill Lee declared a state of emergency in Tennessee due to the increasing number of coronavirus cases.

“We have watched over the past week how Tennesseans have come together to address the tragedy amongst our neighbors as a result of the tornadoes,” Lee said. “Now, it’s time, once again, to come together around a different challenge: COVID-19 in Tennessee.”

So far, the Tennessee State Public Health Laboratory has completed 88 tests for the virus, with nine coming back positive. The other nine positive cases have beeen reported from commercial and private laboratories in the state.


For updated information on the virus, visit tn.gov/health.

Updated 3 p.m. March 11: State health officials confirm two additional coronavirus cases in Davidson, Williamson counties

The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed two additional cases of coronavirus in the state, one in Davidson County and another in Williamson County, bringing the statewide total to nine as of 2 p.m. on March 11.

Overall, there are two cases in Davidson County and five cases in Williamson County, according to the TDH. The other two cases are in Shelby County and Sullivan County.

The second case in Davidson County is an adult male, who is experiencing mild symptoms and remains isolated at home, according to the Metro Public Health Department. In a tweet on Wednesday afternoon, the department said it will be reaching out to the patient’s close contacts.

“Receiving confirmation of an additional case was expected and we are prepared to quickly investigate and provide guidance to those determined to be close contacts to prevent potential spread to others,” said Dr. Michael Caldwell, director of health for Nashville and Davidson County. “Our guidance to the community remains the same; everyone should continue to take steps to protect themselves and others by following routine health precautions.”

On March 10, the TDH announced it had updated its protocol for reporting cases of coronavirus to include each patient’s county of residence. The cases confirmed by the TDH include both confirmed and presumptive positive cases.

“TDH will release counties of residence for all confirmed cases, but will not include further identifying factors like age or gender as we balance transparency with our obligation to lawfully protect patient privacy,“ Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey said in a news release. “While the department’s standard protocol for outbreaks is to announce information by region, we understand COVID-19 is an evolving situation presenting unique concerns for our communities.“

The TDH has performed 68 tests in State Public Health Laboratory, with 61 negative results, according to data released on Wednesday. Two positive results were tested at commercial or private labs.

For more information about the virus, the TDH has launched a public information line at 877-857-2945 open daily from 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

Updated March 10, 2:15 p.m.: Cases of coronavirus in Tennessee climbs to 7 statewide

The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed a seventh case of coronavirus in the state as of 2 p.m. on March 10. Additional details about the case have not yet been announced. According to previous announcements from the TDH, the majority of the cases confirmed to date have been in Middle Tennessee.

Updated March 10, 11:25 a.m.: Two new cases of Coronavirus identified in the Middle Tennessee area, bringing state total to 6

The Tennessee Department of Health announced March 10 there are now two additional cases of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, in the Middle Tennessee area, bringing the state’s total number of confirmed cases to six. The patients are both adult males, according to a news release.

The two new confirmed cases follow four other cases announced by the TDH, including one case in Williamson County, one case in Davidson County, one case in Shelby County and one other case identified only as being in the Middle Tennessee region.

"TDH is working closely with local health officials to support the ongoing investigations of COVID-19 cases," the department said in the release. "The overall risk to the public remains low as COVID-19 is not currently widespread in Tennessee or the United States."

As of March 8, the TDH’s State Public Health Laboratory has been authorized to run testing for coronavirus seven days a week.

According to state health officials, the virus is a respiratory disease presenting with fever, cough and shortness of breath.

For more information about the virus, the TDH has launched a public information line at 877-857-2945 open daily from 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

Updated, 8:15 p.m.: Vanderbilt University cancels classes for remainder of week, suspends in-person classes through end of March

Following a fourth confirmed case of coronavirus in the state, officials with Vanderbilt University announced March 9 the university will cancel classes until March 16, after which it will move from in-person classes to online and other alternative learning options.

"To be clear, the university will remain open, and we will be actively reviewing the situation to determine if and when in-person classes may resume," Interim Chancellor and Provost Susan Wente said in a letter to students. "We may extend the alternative learning approach through the end of the Spring semester—April 30—if necessary. We will keep in touch with you every step of the way."

The announcement comes after several students reported coming in contact with an individual who tested positive for coronavirus, also known as COVID-19. University officials said the individual has not returned to campus.

According to university requirements sent out March 8, students who have had direct contact with someone who is infected with COVID-19, or who have traveled to China, South Korea, Iran or Italy, are not permitted to return to campus until they have completed a 14-day self-isolation period and been cleared to return.

Students will hear from individual deans and instructors on how to proceed with classes, according to Wente.

"We take great pride in our residential living-learning model, which provides invaluable connections, camaraderie and support," Wente said. "Although this is one of Vanderbilt’s great strengths, we also recognize that these are extraordinary times that require exceptional measures to deal with a health risk that affects us all."

Additionally, all university-sponsored non-athletics events and gatherings, including events sponsored by any registered student organizations, are suspended until April 30, according to the letter. University-sponsored travel will also be restricted. Plans are still in place to hold commencement ceremonies for graduating students in May, barring any additional changes, Wente said.

Original post, 11:36 a.m.: Four total cases of coronavirus confirmed in Tennessee, including three in Middle Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Health announced March 9 there is now one additional case of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, in the Middle Tennessee area, bringing the state’s total number of confirmed cases to four.

The patient is an adult female, according to a news release. The TDH did not release any other details.

To date, there are two other confirmed cases in the Middle Tennessee area: an adult woman in Davidson County and an adult male in Williamson County. The other case is in Shelby County, according to state health officials.

“The overall risk to the public remains low as COVID-19 is not currently widespread in Tennessee or the United States,” the TDH said in the release.

Mayor John Cooper spoke about the third confirmed case, which is in Davidson County, at a press conference March 8.

"Now, this obviously comes at a time when Nashville wants and needs to give each other a big hug. It deserves to give each other a big hug, and we still need to do that," Cooper said. "The community response requires us all to listen to our health care experts and take common-sense precautions to protect each other. We are working closely with the [Centers for Disease Control] and [the] state department of health."

As of March 8, the TDH’s State Public Health Laboratory has been authorized to run testing for coronavirus seven days a week.

According to the TDH, the virus is a respiratory disease presenting with fever, cough and shortness of breath. For more information about the virus, the TDH has launched a public information line at 877-857-2945 open daily from 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

This story is developing, check back for updates.
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By Wendy Sturges

A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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