As coronavirus outbreak keeps residents at home, Nashville-area gardening expert shares tips for spring season

Trying to prepare your garden for a successful season? Here are some tips on how to get started. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Trying to prepare your garden for a successful season? Here are some tips on how to get started. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Trying to prepare your garden for a successful season? Here are some tips on how to get started. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

With local and statewide safer-at-home orders now in place, many residents in the Greater Nashville area are spending more time at home to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

For local residents with green thumbs—or even those who feel inspired to become first-time gardeners—there are several ways to prepare for the spring gardening season.

Community Impact Newspaper recently spoke with Shanna Jones, plant collections manager at Cheekwood Estate and Gardens, about how residents can make the most out of their home gardens this year. Additionally, find Jones' five gardening tips below.

Because it’s not quite time to plant tomatoes and other summer vegetables outside due to cooler nights, what are some things gardeners should be planting right now?

Right. We want to wait until after April 15 to plant tender plants because that is usually the cut-off date for any late frosts which could kill many summer vegetables. The entire month of April is still a great time to plant trees, shrubs and perennials.


What advice do you have for beginning gardeners who are taking advantage of this time at home to explore gardening for the first time?

What a beginner gardener decides to first embark on depends on how ambitious that person is feeling. One could begin with a simple pack of seeds, starting them inside to protect them from birds and taking advantage of the warmer temps inside the house; seeds need a soil temperature of around 70 degrees to germinate.

It’s also an ideal time to select a portion of the landscape to create a small garden. Be sure to consider the specifications of the space like sun exposure but also personal preferences, for instance, how often you are prepared to water and choose plants accordingly. Most garden centers are still open during quarantine and their merchandise is often categorized to represent plants’ needs for easy and fun shopping.

For residents that only have access to balconies or patios, what types of planting do you recommend to make the most out of limited space?

I love grouping different sizes and colors of containers together. Adding plants that offer various heights, habits and textures can create a robust and beautiful scene even in a small space. It’s also important to think vertically, so not only taller plants, but maximizing the given area by using shelving and hanging containers. These are some of the garden centers in the Greater Nashville area that are either open to the public or offering curbside pickup and delivery services.



These are some of the garden centers in the Greater Nashville area that are either open to the public or offering curbside pickup and delivery services.

Southwest Nashville

All Seasons Gardening & Brewing Supply Co.

924 8th Ave. S., Nashville

615-214-5465

Open for curbside pickup

Creekside Garden Center

106 Harding Place, Nashville

615-356-2201

Open for curbside pickup and delivery

Flower Mart

4503 Harding Pike, Nashville

615-490-3966

Open for curbside pickup and delivery

Franklin/Brentwood

Hewitt Garden and Design Center

2525 Hillsboro Road, Ste. 6227, Franklin

615-661-6767

Open to the public as well as curbside pickup and delivery to 37027 and 37069 zip codes

Southbranch Nursery

6941 Nolensville Pike, Brentwood

615-776-1818

Open to the public and curbside delivery

Tennessee Nursery and Landscape Supply

4114 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin

615-595-8598

Open to the public

Did we miss a business? Let us know by sending an email to our editorial team at swnnews@communityimpact.com.


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