Metro Nashville Public Schools planning three scenarios for fall 2020

Adrienne Battle, Metro Nashville Public Schools director, said the district is preparing for three different scenarios in light of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (Dylan Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
Adrienne Battle, Metro Nashville Public Schools director, said the district is preparing for three different scenarios in light of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (Dylan Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Adrienne Battle, Metro Nashville Public Schools director, said the district is preparing for three different scenarios in light of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (Dylan Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

As districts across the state grapple with how to reopen schools in August, Metro Nashville Public Schools Director Adrienne Battle said the district is preparing for three different scenarios in light of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

In a press conference June 9, officials shared details for each of the three scenarios developed by a task force led by Battle and Dr. Alex Jahangir, chair of Metro Nashville's COVID-19 task force. The group also includes representatives from charter schools, private schools, health care officials and emergency management experts.

“Nashville has made a lot of progress, and we are optimistic for a return to some sense of normalcy in August, but we must be vigilant to ensure the safety of all when doing so,” Battle said. “A unified framework for all schools will give families a clear direction for where the city is going to be in the fall, with the flexibility necessary for individual schools and organizations to develop their own plans based on the needs of their students.”

According to the proposed options, students may receive in-person instruction, remote learning or a hybrid of in-person and online instruction. The district will release additional details for reopening schools on July 6, Battle said.

On June 8, Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced that the city is working with MNPS to provide laptops and internet hot spots to thousands of students who do not have access to Wi-Fi in order to help them be able to complete remote learning assignments.


“The coronavirus has highlighted a digital learning divide in our community, as young Nashvillians who do not have the means to continue their education remotely and engage with their teachers and peers online are placed at a clear and early disadvantage,” Cooper said.

MNPS, which is scheduled to begin classes Aug. 4, will decide which scenario is best based on the following levels of community spread, according to the plan.

No spread to minimal spread: Schools will reopen and operate until normal conditions. This scenario corresponds with Phase 4 of the city's reopening plan, under which most place would be allowed to reopen.

Minimal to moderate spread: Schools will reopen with significant social distancing guidelines in place to reduce the potential spread of COVID-19. Students, staff and teachers will wear masks in common areas, meals will be eaten in classes when possible and large-scale assemblies will be discontinued. This scenario corresponds with Phase 3 of the city's reopening plan.

Significant spread: Schools will be closed with remote learning in place whenever possible. This scenario corresponds with Phase 2 of the city's reopening plan, which the city has been in for the past few weeks.

According to the plan, each campus will develop their own plans for how to operate under the scenarios listed.

See the full plan on the district's website.