As phased reopening begins in some cities, Frothy Monkey dining areas in Franklin, Nashville remain closed, will continue curbside pickup and delivery

Frothy Monkey has Middle Tennessee locations in Franklin and Nashville. (Courtesy Frothy Monkey)
Frothy Monkey has Middle Tennessee locations in Franklin and Nashville. (Courtesy Frothy Monkey)

Frothy Monkey has Middle Tennessee locations in Franklin and Nashville. (Courtesy Frothy Monkey)

Although Gov. Bill Lee announced plans to begin reopening restaurants and retailers throughout 89 of Tennessee’s 95 counties beginning April 27, some restaurants have decided to not reopen at 50% capacity just yet.

Restaurant and coffee shop Frothy Monkey will keep its dining areas closed in Franklin and Nashville until the owners believe it is "safe for staff and guests to gather in them," according to an update on the company's website.

"We will be carefully considering factors including the unique needs of our staff, our guests, and our operations, while using recommendations from health organizations, as well as the phased plan presented by Nashville’s Mayor, as guidance for our decisions company wide," the update said. "Our decisions will be data driven, not date driven, which means we do not have an exact timeline for reopening fully."

According to the update, Frothy Monkey will continue to offer delivery and curbside pickup. Over the next few weeks, the restaurant also plans to expand its menu and hours of operation.

"We will continue to innovate to stay relevant in an effort to employ more staff, and continue to offer the best quality experience possible," the update said. "Our goal is to invest our resources in sustainable practices as we add staff and begin the process of reopening fully."


Under Lee's reopening guidelines, the state recommends employees at restaurants and retailers wear cloth masks and continue to practice federal guidelines in regards to hygiene and workplace sanitation standards. Restaurants are also encouraged to keep tables 6 feet apart, not reopen bar areas and outline safer ways to handle menus and silverware.

“We expect that businesses will take and commit to and post this pledge to take care of their customers,” Lee said in a press conference on April 24. “We think the consumer will enforce [the guidelines], the business community itself will enforce them.”

In Davidson County, which is not included in Lee's plan to reopen businesses, the city's four-part reopening plan relies on the downward trend or flattening of new reported cases for 14 days before advancing to the next phase. As of April 27, all nonessential businesses remain closed, and restaurants and bars can only offer takeout and delivery services.