Adele’s serves seasonal, locally sourced dishes

Adele’s offers several breakfast cocktails to choose from, including a bacon-topped bourbon drink and others. (Courtesy Adele's)
Adele’s offers several breakfast cocktails to choose from, including a bacon-topped bourbon drink and others. (Courtesy Adele's)

Adele’s offers several breakfast cocktails to choose from, including a bacon-topped bourbon drink and others. (Courtesy Adele's)

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Chef Bron Lindsey said the eatery works with local farmers to provide season menu items. (Courtesy Adele's)
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Adele's offers American food in The Gulch for weekend lunch, daily dinner service and Sunday brunch. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
Adele’s, a restaurant opened in 2014 by James Beard Award-winning chef Jonathan Waxman, offers farm-to-table dishes in the former home of an auto repair shop in The Gulch.

Named in honor of Waxman’s mother, Adele’s features three garage doors that transform the space into an open-air restaurant during warmer months, according to Executive Chef Bron Lindsey. In keeping with the restaurant’s open concept, visitors can watch Lindsey and other chefs prepare lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch from the dining area.

“We have a very collaborative kitchen here, and somehow, after talking through ideas all day, we always end up on the same page,” Lindsey said. “With the North Carolina crispy catfish, that’s three people’s ideas in one dish.”

The catfish served at Adele’s—a lunch dish Lindsey said will soon be added to the dinner menu—is one example of Lindsey’s commitment to serving fresh ingredients and working with sustainable fisheries, he said. Whether it is catfish from North Carolina, salmon from the coast of Chile or trout from a river in Idaho, Lindsey said the fillets are on diners’ plates within three to four days of coming out of the water.

“That’s pretty good for being landlocked,” Lindsey said. “Good seafood can be really hard to serve in Tennessee because we’re just too far away from any giant body of water.”


However, most ingredients used in dishes at Adele’s come from much closer sources in Tennessee, he said. From an unexpected delivery of oyster mushrooms in late December to whole hogs supplied weekly by Palmer Farms in Lewisburg, Lindsey said serving seasonal dishes requires forging and maintaining relationships with local farmers.

“We change our menu four times a year, which means we have a lot of conversations with farmers about what’s available and what they can grow for us,” Lindsey said. “Sometimes, products just show up that we’re really impressed with. It’s always exciting for us.”

On Sundays, Adele’s offers a brunch special, featuring lunch and dinner offerings paired with breakfast items such as buttermilk biscuits, sawmill grits and house-made granola. The menu also includes cured roast beef, fried green tomatoes and other dishes that are only available on the brunch menu.

“At the brunch buffet on Sunday, we always serve Adele’s staples, like JW [Jonathan Waxman] chicken, JW potatoes and kale salad, along with everything else,” Lindsey said. “If you try those at brunch, that opens up the chance to try something new next time you’re in for dinner.”

Adele's

1210 McGavock St., Nashville

615-988-9700

www.adelesnashville.com

Hours: Mon.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri. 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., 5-10:30 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 5-10:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m., 5-9 p.m.
By Wendy Sturges

A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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