Chateau West in West End serves classic French cuisine

French onion soup, served in a cup or bowl, is available for both lunch and dinner. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
French onion soup, served in a cup or bowl, is available for both lunch and dinner. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

French onion soup, served in a cup or bowl, is available for both lunch and dinner. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Owner Huseyin Ustunkaya opened Chateau West in 2014. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
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The goat cheese and roasted beet salad is served with fried goat cheese fritters and roasted beets. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Chateau West is located off of I-440 on West End Avenue. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
More than a decade after Huseyin Ustunkaya opened a Turkish restaurant, Anatolia, with his brother, Harun, in 2003, a structure off I-440 on West End Avenue suitable for a second eatery captured his attention.

Ustunkaya said he was drawn to the building’s peaked roof, and after several months of renovations, he began serving French cuisine at Chateau West in February 2014.

“The building kind of looked like a chateau but, of course, much smaller,” Ustunkaya said. “It went through quite the transformation from a Japanese restaurant that served sushi to fine dining.”

Chateau West is open for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch and offers a fusion of classic French and American dishes in an “elevated” space.

From starters and salads to main entrees, the dinner menu at Chateau West expands from the lunch menu to include additional meat, seafood and vegetable options. However, before diners jump into the main course, Ustunkaya said he recommends parties start off with one of several varieties of fondue, foie gras or another appetizer.


For Chateau West’s chateaubriand—a dish typically shared between two guests—a center-cut filet is carved and served table-side along with seasonal vegetables, roasted potatoes and a traditional sauce made with clarified butter, egg yolk and white wine vinegar, Ustunkaya said. Other main courses include grilled sea bass served whole; spiced lamb rack; and roasted duck breast.

On the lunch menu, guests will find smaller portions as well as lunch-only options, such as the deep dish quiche of the day, a pulled duck confit sandwich and a croque monsieur—a ham sandwich that can become a croque madame when topped with a fried egg. The menu also offers lighter choices, such as French onion soup and various salads.

Ustunkaya said he has always envisioned Chateau West as being a place where both locals and tourists can experience fine dining similar to what one might find in Bordeaux, a city in southwestern France.

“People can enjoy classic French food without leaving Music City,” Ustunkaya said.

Chateau West

3408 West End Ave., Nashville

615-432-2622

www.chateauwestrestaurant.com

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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