Nashville reverting to Phase 2 of economic reopening; Mayor John Cooper orders bars to close

Beginning July 3, Nashville will revert to a modified version of Phase 2 of economic reopening. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
Beginning July 3, Nashville will revert to a modified version of Phase 2 of economic reopening. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Beginning July 3, Nashville will revert to a modified version of Phase 2 of economic reopening. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced July 2 that the city will close bars for at least two weeks and reduce restaurant capacity from 75% to 50% as part of a modified return to Phase 2 of economic reopening.

Beginning July 3, Nashville will revert to Phase 2 "for the next several weeks, at least," according to Cooper.

“Nashville faces another challenge in a season of challenges," Cooper said. "Our Phase 3 has not been effective. We are going to go back to what we know is effective in slowing the spread of the disease.

As part of the modified reopening phase, businesses that opened in Phase 3, including bars and event and entertainment venues, will be temporarily closed, according to Cooper.

Metro Parks facilities that opened in Phase 3 will remain open, including dog parks, skate parks, basketball courts and playgrounds. Recreational leagues will be permitted, and pools will remain open, as outbreaks have not been traced back to these venues or activities, Cooper said.


As of July 2, Davidson County has reported a total of 10,743 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, including 3,172 active cases. According to public health data, 608 cases have been reported in the past 24 hours. There have been 111 COVID-19-related deaths in Davidson County.

Michael Caldwell, Metro Nashville Public Health director, issued Public Health Order 8 on June 28, requiring all residents to wear masks or facial coverings in public beginning June 29. Metro Nashville Police Department officers will issue citizen advisory notices to individuals who are not wearing masks or face coverings in indoor and outdoor public spaces.

“By observing our public health orders, maintaining a safe social distance from one another and wearing a face covering whenever possible, we can limit the spread of the disease and help protect each other," Cooper said.

This story is developing. Check back for updates.