Gov. Bill Lee establishes economic recovery group to help declining state economy

Gov. Bill Lee established an economic recovery group April 16 with members from across state departments, legislative members and the private sector to help reboot the state’s economy. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
Gov. Bill Lee established an economic recovery group April 16 with members from across state departments, legislative members and the private sector to help reboot the state’s economy. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Gov. Bill Lee established an economic recovery group April 16 with members from across state departments, legislative members and the private sector to help reboot the state’s economy. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Gov. Bill Lee established an economic recovery group from across state departments, legislative members and the private sector April 16 to help reboot the state’s economy.

“COVID-19 has not only created a public health crisis; it has hurt thousands of businesses and hundreds of thousands of hardworking Tennesseans,” Lee said in a release. “As we work to safely open Tennessee’s economy, this group will provide guidance to industries across the state on the best ways to get Tennesseans back to work.”

As the number of coronavirus cases has surpassed 6,000 across the state since the first was discovered in Williamson County in March, hundreds of thousands of Tennessee residents have filed for unemployment benefits due to the economic downturn brought about by the pandemic.

Mark Ezell, the commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Tourism Development, was appointed as the director of the economic recovery group by Lee.

“This public-private partnership will prioritize connection, collaboration, and communication across industries, the medical community and state government,” Ezell said. “We’re grateful to these leaders for serving at a critical time in our state’s history.”


Other members of the governor’s economic recovery group and their positions are as follows.

  • Sammie Arnold, Chief of Staff

  • House Majority Leader William Lamberth (R – Portland)

  • Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson (R – Franklin)

  • Brandon Gibson, Senior Advisor to Governor Lee

  • Bob Rolfe, Department of Economic and Community Development

  • Greg Gonzales, Department of Financial Institutions

  • David Gerregano, Department of Revenue

  • Dr. Charles Hatcher, Department of Agriculture

  • Dr. Jeff McCord, Department of Labor and Workforce Development

  • Hodgen Mainda, Department of Commerce and Insurance

  • Tony Niknejad, Governor’s Office

  • Brig. Gen. Scott Brower, COVID-19 Unified Command

  • Dr. Morgan McDonald, TN Dept. of Health, Deputy Commissioner

  • Butch Eley, Department of Finance & Administration

  • Jim Brown, National Federation of Independent Business

  • Bradley Jackson, TN Chamber of Commerce

  • Beverly Robertson, President & CEO of the Memphis Chamber of Commerce

  • Rob Ikard, TN Grocers & Convenience Store Association

  • Rob Mortensen, TN Hospitality & Tourism Association

  • Colin Barrett, TN Bankers Association

  • Fred Robinson, TN Credit Union League

  • Dave Huneryager, TN Trucking Association

  • Will Cromer, TN Hospital Association

  • Mayor Kevin Davis, President of TN County Services Association

  • Mayor Jill Holland, President of TN Municipal League

  • Jeff Aiken, TN Farm Bureau

  • Tari Hughes, Center for Non-Profit Management

  • Roland Myers, TN Retail Association

  • Clay Crownover, President & CEO of Associated Builders & Contractors of Tennessee



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