Metro Nashville Council votes to keep electric scooters under new regulations

Electric scooters will remain in Nashville in limited ways following the Metro Nashville Council's approval at the July 16 meeting.

The action follows Mayor David Briley’s June 21 request to the Metro Nashville Council to ban scooters, at least temporarily, due to lack of enforcement and regulation. In May, Briley issued a 30-day notice for scooter companies to address safety concerns.

“After much thought, I have decided to recommend to the Metro [Nashville] Council that the existing [electric scooter] pilot program terminate and that scooters be removed from the Metro right-of-ways immediately upon the enactment of the Council legislation,” Briley said in the letter.

Instead of banning electric scooters, the ordinance approved at the July 16 meeting calls for fewer companies, reduced scooter fleets and more safety regulations. District 7 Council Member Anthony Davis, District 25 Council Member Russ Pulley and District 28 Council Member Tanaka Vercher sponsored the legislation.

The ordinance requires existing companies—Bird, Lime, Lyft, Spin, Jump, Bolt and Gotcha Mobility—to immediately reduce their scooter fleets by 50% until the Metro Transportation Licensing Commission conducts a selection process to determine the three companies that will be allowed to remain in Nashville. The commission must determine the three companies within 100 days, according to the ordinance.

In addition to limiting the number of scooter companies to three, the ordinance allowing scooters to remain in Nashville includes the following regulations:

  • Each company must have two full-time employees per 100 electric scooters or bikes.

  • Each company must pay up to $10,000 a year for the Metro Transportation Licensing Committee or Metro Nashville Public Works to install signage indicating prohibited riding areas, such as sidewalks.

  • Each company will have 30 minutes to respond to all Americans with Disabilities Act-related issues and complaints and two hours to respond to all other complaints.

  • Slow zones will be established in areas such as Broadway between Seventh Avenue and the Cumberland River and 2nd Avenue between Broadway and Union Street.

  • No-ride zones will be established at all greenways.


The ordinance passed unanimously with four abstentions, including At-Large Council Member Bob Mendes, District 9 Council Member Bill Pridemore, District 17 Council Member Colby Sledge and District 23 Council Member Mina Johnson.

"I still have concerns about the safety, and many of my constituents are still concerned about the safety," Johnson said. "We're not living in a perfect world. We do not have the sidewalks, the bikeways, the dedicated scooter ways or safe streets."

If not content with the new regulations in place, members of the Metro Nashville Council said they will revisit a total ban at the Aug. 20 meeting.
By


MOST RECENT

With a clinical background in internal, pulmonary and critical care medicine, Corry has been with BCM for 20 years. He now focuses primarily on inflammatory lung diseases, such as asthma and smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. (Graphic by Ronald Winters/Community Impact Newspaper)
Q&A: Baylor College of Medicine's Dr. David Corry discusses immunity, vaccine production amid COVID-19 pandemic

Rapid development and distribution of a vaccine worldwide and successful achievement of herd immunity will be key players in determining the lifespan of the COVID-19 pandemic, said Dr. David Corry, a professor of Medicine in the Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology Section at Baylor College of Medicine.

Here are the coronavirus data updates to know today in Tennessee. (Community Impact staff)
Tennessee coronavirus cases rise by over 1,900 in 24 hours

In Davidson County, there have been at least 12,935 reported cases. Williamson County has reported 1,670 cases.

Williamson County Schools released a reopening framework plan for students and families on July 9 before school begins in early August, with students given the option to receive on-campus or remote instruction. (Courtesy Pixabay)
Williamson County Schools’ 2020-21 plan plus four other Nashville stories

Here are five recent updates from Greater Nashville on plans for education in the fall, governmental moves toward increased public safety and more.

The restaurant offers a variety of milk tea drinks as well as ramen, rice bowls and other dishes. (Courtesy Pexels)
Tea shop and ramen bar Chatime opens Nashville location in Belmont-Hillsboro

The restaurant offers a variety of milk tea drinks as well as ramen, rice bowls and other dishes.

The Tennessee State Capitol Commission voted July 9 to remove the Nathan Bedford Forrest bust from the state capitol. (Screenshot via www.tn.gov)
Commission votes to remove Nathan Bedford Forrest bust from Tennessee Capitol, but it will not be moved just yet

The final decision on moving the bust will be made by the Tennessee Historic Commission.

Tennessee coronavirus cases rise by over 1,600 in 24 hours

The daily totals also include 710 cumulative deaths, 3,088 cumulative hospitalizations and an estimated 33,609 recoveries to date.

Remote learning is expected to last through at least Labor Day at Metro Nashville Public Schools, according to Director of Schools Adrienne Battle. (Courtesy Metro Nashville Public Schools)
Metro Nashville Public Schools to start school year remotely Aug. 4

Remote learning is expected to last through at least Labor Day, according to Director of Schools Adrienne Battle

Metro Nashville Council approved three ordinances related to mask requirements, non-owner-occupied short-term rental properties and home-based businesses at the July 7 meeting. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
Masks, short-term rentals and home-based businesses: 3 ordinances approved by Metro Nashville Council July 7

Metro Nashville Council approved three ordinances related to mask requirements, non-owner-occupied short-term rental properties and home-based businesses at the July 7 meeting.

Census worker
2020 census: Bureau prepares nonresponse follow-up field operations

For individuals who have not responded to the 2020 census, one of about 500,000 census takers will visit the their household between Aug. 11-Oct. 31.

Here are the coronavirus data updates to know today in Tennessee. (Community Impact staff)
Tennessee coronavirus cases rise by over 2,400 in 24 hours, marking the largest single-day increase in cases to date

The daily totals also include 685 cumulative deaths, 3,025 cumulative hospitalizations and an estimated 32,736 recoveries to date.

New guidelines released by ICE require foreign students to take mostly in-person classes to stay in the U.S. on education visas. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
New U.S. guidelines require exchange students to take in-person classes this fall

The guidelines released by ICE require foreign students to take mostly in-person classes to stay in the U.S. on education visas.