Textile Fabrics in Berry Hill offers an array of fabrics for clothing, masks and more

Textile Fabrics
As customers visit Textile Fabrics for supplies to make homemade face masks, quilting cotton remains the best-selling item at the store. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

As customers visit Textile Fabrics for supplies to make homemade face masks, quilting cotton remains the best-selling item at the store. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

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For sewn cloth face coverings, individuals will need a handful of materials and access to a sewing machine. (Graphic by Chelsea King/Community Impact Newspaper)
For more than four decades, family-owned business Textile Fabrics has supplied the Nashville area with fabrics for all types of occasions, according to owner Chip Grimes.

Grimes, whose parents purchased Textile Fabrics in 1980, took over the business in the early ‘90s and relocated the shop from Green Hills to the Melrose area about a decade later. In 2015, the business moved about a mile away to its current location on Craighead Street in Berry Hill.

Textile Fabrics carries a selection of fabrics created from natural, synthetic and manufactured fibers, which can be used for crafts, fashion, weddings and more. For those who visit the shop with ideas for projects, Grimes said sta members will work with customers to determine the best materials to use.

“We have an excellent staff with extensive sewing experience to advise and assist our customers,” Grimes said. “We take great pride in doing our best to help each person who comes in with any project, whether simple or challenging.”

Customers can find everything from linens and knits for summer sewing to woolens for suits, dresses and coats. Textile Fabrics also features a bridal section, which includes satins, trims, taffetas, veiling and other materials for designers to choose from.


However, since mid-March, the shop’s bestselling product has been quilting cotton, which can be used to create face masks, according to Grimes. The shop has also increased its supply of elastic to keep up with the demand.

“Since [sewers] in Nashville have risen to the challenge of making masks for COVID-19, we have sold more cotton, interfacing and elastic, and we continue to,” Grimes said.

Before reopening to the public May 10, the store was open by appointment only. But in that time, several customers made masks for area hospitals, while others bought supplies for family members and neighbors, according to Grimes.

“Our business was considered nonessential and closed, but because of demand, I took appointments and personally sold mask supplies through the pandemic,” Grimes said. “It was amazing to witness the willingness of sewers to help by contributing masks to the cause.”


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