'We'll come back even stronger': Shakti Power Yoga in Southwest Nashville transitions to virtual classes during coronavirus outbreak

Shakti Power Yoga, located on Music Row, is one of several yoga studios in Nashville offering online classes during the coronavirus outbreak. (Courtesy Shakti Power Yoga)
Shakti Power Yoga, located on Music Row, is one of several yoga studios in Nashville offering online classes during the coronavirus outbreak. (Courtesy Shakti Power Yoga)

Shakti Power Yoga, located on Music Row, is one of several yoga studios in Nashville offering online classes during the coronavirus outbreak. (Courtesy Shakti Power Yoga)

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Lauren Farina is the co-owner of Shakti Power Yoga in Music Row. (Courtesy Shakti Power Yoga)
As fitness studios across Nashville have closed their doors temporarily, many instructors and small business owners have transitioned to online classes as a way to maintain a sense of community among clients.

Lauren Farina and Kelly Carter opened Shakti Power Yoga in 2012 as a way to introduce power yoga—an energizing style of yoga focused on building strength, stamina and flexibility—to the Nashville area. Together, the sisters lead a team of more than 20 instructors that teach up to 12 classes each day in heated and unheated rooms.

“We fell in love with yoga and how it changed our lives,” Farina said. “At the time, power yoga was missing in Nashville. We wanted to create a space for people to come together, to feel welcome and be connected and supported by others.”Lauren Farina is the co-owner of Shakti Power Yoga in Music Row. (Courtesy Shakti Power Yoga)

The studio, located inside a 150-year-old home on Music Row, live-streamed its first class on Instagram on March 14. More than a week later, instructors now host between four to five meditation and yoga classes each day, which are later uploaded to YouTube for those who want to catch up. Along with local clients, the classes are attracting people from places such as California, Italy and London, Farina said.

“What's keeping us around is being able to live stream and have people join us from all over, even people that used to live in Nashville that can’t practice with us in person anymore,” she said. “We're getting a lot of support from the community, and I think that just reaffirms what we’ve been doing all along. We teach yoga to create community, so we're just going to keep doing that however we can.”


While the virtual classes are free to those who want to follow along, the studio also accepts donations as a way to help pay instructors. Farina said the team at Shakti is working on additional meditation and power yoga offerings, which she expects to be available to members in the coming weeks.

“This is a very challenging time for brick and mortar businesses ... things like rent, taxes and bills don’t just go away,” she said. “We want people to feel like their memberships are still valuable and know that they’re helping us through this. We’re doing our best to make it work by adapting the content and staying connected to them even if we’re not all side by side on the mat.”

Once the studio reopens, Farina said she looks forward to welcoming back longtime members as well as new clients who may have never before practiced yoga before discovering the virtual classes.

“Our community is so strong and so loving and generous,” Farina said. “I know we’ll get through it, and we’ll come back even stronger.”

Shakti Power Yoga

65 Music Square East, Nashville

615-942-8100

www.shaktiyoganashville.com

Instagram: @shaktipoweryoga
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