Sweet Seven Organic Salon offers low-chemical products

Owner Debra Dickey has been using low-chemical hair color for more than a decade at Sweet Seven Organic Salon. Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper
Owner Debra Dickey has been using low-chemical hair color for more than a decade at Sweet Seven Organic Salon. Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper

Owner Debra Dickey has been using low-chemical hair color for more than a decade at Sweet Seven Organic Salon. Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper

Image description
Owner Debra Dickey has been using low-chemical hair color for more than a decade at Sweet Seven Organic Salon. Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper
Image description
Sweet Seven Organic Salon owner Debra Dickey uses Original & Mineral, a low-chemical hair color. Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper
After nearly two decades working in the hair industry, Debra Dickey said she noticed herself developing asthma symptoms. Her doctor told her she would need to stop using products with strong chemicals right away.

“My doctor looked at me dead in the eyes and told me that the chemicals used in hair colors caused this problem,” Dickey said. “At that moment, I felt like I was going into shock. Hair color was my whole career.”

Dickey said she wasted no time and began immediately researching more natural products available to stylists as well as how she would incorporate them into her business after years of working with traditional hair dyes.

“Out of pure desperation, I had to figure out how to keep my business alive,” Dickey said. “After learning more about what harmful chemicals were legal to use in the U.S. versus in other countries, I knew I had to do something to stop that cycle and switch to something more natural.”

Now, about 12 years after her asthma diagnosis, Dickey uses low-chemical hair dyes on her clients at Sweet Seven Organic Salon, located in Fort Houston near Berry Hill. As the only employee, she offers haircuts, color and other salon services in a space free of chemicals, such as ammonia.


“I’m always up front with my clients that professional stylists have to work with at least a small amount of chemicals to know what the end results are going to be,” she said. “I think they are surprised to find out that low-chemical lines last much longer on hair than one would think.”

While Dickey said giving up her career as a hairstylist was not an option she even considered, she originally planned to make a living in the fashion industry. However, she said she considers working with hair to be a form of fashion.

“I never thought I was going to be a hairdresser when I grew up,” Dickey said. “I always thought I was going to be a fashion designer, but I’ve come to realize that hair is also fashion ... It’s sculpting, it’s cutting and it’s designing.”

Although hair styling was not her original career path, Dickey said the job is rewarding.

“I hear a lot of wonderful stories from clients, but I also hear about the sad things that are a part of life,” Dickey said. “To make someone feel better before they even walk out of the door is a reward that I wasn’t prepared for when I started this career.”

Sweet Seven Organic Salon

2028 Lindell Ave., Nashville

615-438-4951

www.sweetsevenorganicsalon.com

Hours: Mon.-Thu. 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., closed Sun.
SHARE THIS STORY
By Wendy Sturges

A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


MOST RECENT

Metro Nashville begins decades-long commitment to clean energy

The city is working to meet sustainability goals by 2050.

The next MNPS superintendent is expected to be announced by the end of March. (Courtesy Metro Nashville Public Schools)
Metro Nashville Public Schools narrows superintendent search to 5

Interviews with semifinalists will be held March 2-6.

Amid Nashville's hotel boom, employee pipeline is slim

Industry experts say Nashville’s hotel boom is far from over.

Mayor John Cooper speaks at his inauguration event Sept. 28 at Stratford STEM Magnet High School. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)
Mayor John Cooper announces $154M in capital project recommendations

Cooper is recommending $72 million in public school improvements in the next fiscal year.

The next MNPS superintendent is expected to be announced by the end of March. (Courtesy Metro Nashville Public Schools)
Metro Nashville Public Schools superintendent search draws 19 candidates

The next superintendent is expected to be announced by the end of March.

water
City of Belle Meade continues sewer modeling, working to identify improvement projects

The city has identified water pressure issues on the north side of Belle Meade.

building
Metro Nashville Council approves new zoning district, seeks to ease community concerns related to short-term rentals

Metro Nashville Council approved an ordinance during its Feb. 18 meeting to create a new type of zoning option that prohibits short-term rental properties from new developments.

Rukus Cycling Studios now open in The Gulch in Nashville

The indoor cycling studio offers high-intensity rides in 30-60-minute sessions.

Apple & Oak
Apple and Oak now closed in Hillsboro Village

Customers can still visit Apple & Oak's East Nashville location at 717 Porter Road, Nashville.

Molly Green
Clothing retailer Molly Green relocates inside The Mall at Green Hills in Nashville

Molly Green has three other locations in the Nashville area.

Louie's Wine Dive
Louie’s Wine Dive closes Midtown location in Nashville

The bar and restaurant opened in June 2018.

Jessie James Decker's Kittenish in The Gulch to celebrate first anniversary with meet-and-greet

The shop is celebrating its first anniversary with events throughout the weekend.

Back to top