Nashville's Fourth of July fireworks show canceled

Nashville fireworks
In place of the fireworks show, residents can watch a televised special featuring performances by local artists accompanied by clips of previous years’ fireworks displays. (Courtesy Pexel)

In place of the fireworks show, residents can watch a televised special featuring performances by local artists accompanied by clips of previous years’ fireworks displays. (Courtesy Pexel)

The Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp. will no longer carry out the city's annual fireworks display planned for July 4, Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced in a press conference July 2.

“It is clear that adding any public health risk is inappropriate for Nashville at this time," Cooper said. "So, we’ve directed the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp. to cancel its fireworks display on Saturday evening."

In place of the fireworks show, NewsChannel 5 will air a one-hour special at 9 p.m. July 4 featuring live performances by local artists, including John Hiatt, Lilly Hiatt, Keb’Mo’ and Tenille Townes as well as clips of previous years’ fireworks displays, according to a news release.

The NCVC announced May 20 the cancellation of the city's annual Fourth of July concert in downtown Nashville headlined by Brad Paisley, who is slated to headline next year's event.

"After putting together a small July 4th celebration that prioritized the health and safety of our city, we have decided to cancel the short fireworks show we had planned for downtown to broadcast on NewsChannel 5," said Butch Spyridon, the CEO of the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp., in a statement. "While we are disappointed, the significant increase in COVID cases this week made it clear that we needed to take any steps possible to discourage crowds from gathering."


At the same press conference, Cooper announced the city will close bars for at least two weeks and reduce restaurant capacity from 75% to 50% as part of a modified return to Phase 2 of economic reopening beginning July 3.

“Nashville faces another challenge in a season of challenges," Cooper said. "Our Phase 3 has not been effective. We are going to go back to what we know is effective in slowing the spread of the disease."

In 2019, 343,000 people attended the city's annual Fourth of July concert, according to the NCVC. The event generated $14.2 million in direct visitor spending, a 31% increase over 2018.


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