Mayor’s office to hold community listening session for transportation planning

Local officials are working with residents to combat traffic issues in the Greater Nashville area. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Local officials are working with residents to combat traffic issues in the Greater Nashville area. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Local officials are working with residents to combat traffic issues in the Greater Nashville area. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Meetings for the public to provide feedback on transportation improvements they would like to see in the future will begin this week across the city.

Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced in December plans to host public listening sessions to help determine priorities for a Metro Transportation Plan that will identify critical transportation needs as well as opportunities for larger mass-transit projects.

“The right transportation system is critical for our community,” Cooper said in a news release. “It will get you to school, to work, to your doctor’s office, and back home. With Nashville’s recent growth, we’re facing new transportation challenges that we must address with intention, transparency, and full participation from residents throughout Davidson County. From covered bus stops and timely traffic signals to safer intersections and more sidewalks, creating an effective transportation plan begins with the opportunity for everyone who touches our transportation system to provide valuable input.”

The initial focus for the plan will be managing traffic and improving the Metro Nashville bus system, according to an announcement form the mayor’s office.

“The first step in the planning process is determining our transportation priorities,” said Faye DiMassimo, a senior adviser to the mayor for transportation and infrastructure, in a statement. “Safety and efficiency improvements will allow residents to get around the city faster and more reliably. After identifying our most critical needs, the planning process will turn to larger and more ambitious public transportation and mass transit projects.”


A full plan is expected to be released in September, in accordance with Cooper’s promise to have a plan in place by the end of his first year in office, according to the release.

Residents can attend as many sessions as they wish, according to the city’s website. A full list of listening sessions planned over the next few weeks can be found below.

Antioch/ Hickory Hollow

Southeast Community Center

5260 Hickory Hollow Parkway, Ste., 202, Antioch

Thursday, Jan. 9 from 6-8 p.m.

Donelson

FiftyForward Donelson State

108 Donelson Pike, Nashville

Thursday, Jan. 16 from 6-8 p.m.

Bordeaux/Clarksville Pike

Bordeaux Library

4000 Clarksville Pike, Nashville

Thursday, Jan. 23 from 6-7:30 p.m.

North Nashville

Lee Chapel AME

1200 Dr DB Todd Jr. Blvd., Nashville

Tuesday, Jan. 28 from 6-8 p.m.

Joelton

Joelton First Baptist Church

7140 Whites Creek Pike, Joelton

Thursday, Jan. 30 from 6-8 p.m.

West Nashville

West Police Precinct Community Room

5500 Charlotte Pike, Nashville

Thursday, Feb. 6 from 6-8 p.m.

Bellevue

Bellevue Public Library

720 Baugh Road, Nashville

Tuesday, Feb. 11 from 6-8 p.m.

Downtown

Downtown Public Library

615 Church St., Nashville

Tuesday, Feb. 18 from 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Green Hills/ Hillsboro Pike

Church of Christ-Green Hills

3805 Granny White Pike, Nashville

Thursday, Feb. 20 from 6-8 p.m.

Nolensville/South Nashville

Plaza Mariachi

3955 Nolensville Pike, Nashville

Monday, February 24 from 6-8 p.m.

East Nashville/Madison

Studio 615

272 Broadmoor Drive, Nashville

Thursday, Feb. 27 from 6-8 p.m.
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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