MLK Day March, Harlem Globetrotters: 6 events in Southwest Nashville to check out Dec. 31-Jan. 25

The Harlem Globetrotters will perform at Bridgestone Arena on Jan. 25. (Courtesy Harlem Globetrotters)
The Harlem Globetrotters will perform at Bridgestone Arena on Jan. 25. (Courtesy Harlem Globetrotters)

The Harlem Globetrotters will perform at Bridgestone Arena on Jan. 25. (Courtesy Harlem Globetrotters)

Dec. 31

Celebrate with family early on New Year’s Eve


Families with young children who wish to celebrate early on New Year’s Eve can visit the Adventure Science Center for its annual “Happy Noon Year” party. The event features science activities, crafts and a balloon drop celebration to ring in the New Year at noon. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $15-$20. Adventure Science Center, 800 Fort Negley Blvd., Nashville. 615-862-5160. www.adventuresci.org

Jan. 4-5

Check out beads and other jewelry at showcase


The Fairgrounds Nashville is hosting the Intergalactic Bead and Jewelry Show, a two-day showcase with beads and accessories, such as emeralds, rubies, pearls and more, according to organizers. The showcase features products made by more than 100 vendors, including Oriental Treasures and Spring Street Studios. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $5. 500 Wedgewood Ave., Nashville. 888-729-6904. www.beadshows.com

Jan. 5

Go to a student-led rock show


Students enrolled in The School of Rock, a performance-based music school with locations in Nashville and Franklin, are taking the stage at the Ryman Auditorium to perform a selection of songs from the school’s upcoming performance season, including music originally performed by The Beatles, Pink Floyd and the Rolling Stones as well as various funk, indie and ‘90s-era selections. Proceeds from Rockin’ the Ryman will benefit the Green Hills-based nonprofit Learning Matters, according to The School of Rock. 7 p.m. $12-$52. Ryman Auditorium, 116 Fifth Ave. N., Nashville. 615-889-3060. www.ryman.com

Jan. 16-18

See a musical production at Vanderbilt University


Vanderbilt Off-Broadway is continuing its 2019-20 season with a production of “Into the Woods.” A Tony-award winning musical that has been performed on Broadway as well as on the big screen, “Into the Woods” tells the story of a couple that crosses paths with fairy tale characters, such as Cinderella, Rapunzel and Little Red Riding Hood. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $5. Ingram Hall, 2400 Blakemore Ave., Nashville. 615-322-7311. www.vanderbilt.edu

Jan. 20

March in honor of Martin Luther King Jr.


The Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship hosts a ceremonial march honoring Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. that will take participants from Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church to the Gentry Center at Tennessee State University. MSNBC host Joy-Ann Reid will serve as the 31st annual event’s keynote speaker. 10 a.m. Free. Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, 2708 Jefferson St., Nashville (Parade start). www.mlkdaynashville.com

Jan. 25

Watch the Harlem Globetrotters perform tricks


The Harlem Globetrotters are returning to Bridgestone Arena for a family-friendly basketball show, featuring comedy, slam dunks, trick shots and one-on-one time with players. The traveling show’s roster includes Big Easy Lofton, Hi-Lite Bruton, TNT Lister and other players. 2 p.m., 7 p.m. $26 and up. Bridgestone Arena, 501 Broadway. 615-770-2000. www.bridgestonearena.com


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