Nashville healthcare organization Connectus Health opens food pantries at two locations

Connectus Health
Connectus Health provides healthcare to uninsured patients as well as those who qualify based on income at two locations in Nashville. (Photo courtesy of Connectus Health)

Connectus Health provides healthcare to uninsured patients as well as those who qualify based on income at two locations in Nashville. (Photo courtesy of Connectus Health)

Nashville-based nonprofit healthcare organization Connectus Health, in partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, announced Nov. 15 that it has opened food pantries at both of its Nashville clinic locations.

Connectus Health, which provides healthcare to uninsured patients as well as those who qualify based on income, has locations in Berry Hill and southeast Nashville. The clinic recently expanded its offerings to include pediatric services, according to the group.

“At Connectus, we strive to serve as a healthcare home for every single Nashvillian in need, and Second Harvest’s mission aligns perfectly with ours,” said Suzanne Hurley, co-CEO at Connectus Health, in a news release. “We feel so lucky to be able to establish this partnership with them and do our part in alleviating food insecurity in our community.”

The pantries will be stocked with non-perishable food items such as cereal, rice, soups and canned goods as well as personal hygiene items such as soap, deodorant and toothpaste. According to Second Harvest, the organization provided 29 million meals in 2018 to men, women and children in Middle Tennessee.

“The hard reality is that one in eight individuals–including one in six children–are food insecure in Middle Tennessee and are unsure of when or where their next meal will come from,” said Nancy Keil, president and CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee. “Partnerships like this ensure that those facing hunger in our community have access to the food and resources they need to live healthy, active lives.”


The pantries, located at 601 Benton Ave., Nashville, and 2637 Murfreesboro Pike, Nashville, will be open 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m on Friday.

For more information about Connectus Health, visit www.connectus.org.


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