Gallery: See renderings of Bellevue's Preds Ice Center

<p><em>Photo courtesy of NHL.com</em></p>

Photo courtesy of NHL.com

<p><em>Photo courtesy of NHL.com</em></p> <p><em>Photo courtesy of NHL.com</em></p> <p><em>Photo courtesy of NHL.com</em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

Nashville's third ice skating rink and second Preds Ice Center is set to open later this year in Bellevue, joining Centennial Sportsplex and the Preds Ford Ice Center in Antioch.

The 110,000 square-foot facility, located in the mixed-use development Bellevue One Place, is expected to open in September. The building will be home to two sheets of ice. 

Preds Ice Center is owned by the Metro Parks and Recreation Department. The Metropolitan Sports Authority will lease half the building from the parks department and sublease it to the Preds Ice Center.

What to know

The ice center will feature a dry-land training facility, full-service hockey and skating store and private party rooms available for rental, according to a release from the Nashville Predators about the facility.

You'll also find a grab-and-go style concessions booth, as well as a full restaurant with views of both rinks.

What they said

"We can't wait to open this facility," Ford Ice Center General Manager Danny Butler said. "We're excited to have two more sheets of ice in Nashville, which will provide hockey players and figure skaters from all over the state and beyond further opportunities to do what they love."

"This project will be a huge benefit to Bellevue, West Nashville and the surrounding communities, and we're pleased to have the Predators logo at the forefront."

See a few renderings of the space below:



MOST RECENT

One in five children and adults have a learning disability, according to statistics from the National Center for Learning Disabilities. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Q&A: National Center for Learning Disabilities expert discusses challenges of special education, remote learning during pandemic

The NCLD's director of policy and advocacy spoke about the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on special education students and their development in and out of the classroom.