Sanctuary cities request and 2 other things that came out of Tuesday night’s Metro Council meeting

Metro Courthouse

Metro Courthouse

Metro Council met Tuesday night for its second meeting of the month. An agenda is published prior to each meeting and can be found on Metro's website. Here are three things that happened at last night's meeting you should know about:

1. Council asks Gov. Bill Haslam to veto sanctuary cities bill

The council approved a resolution that asks Gov. Haslam to veto a bill that would ban sanctuary cities in Tennessee.

The council voted 21-4 to approve the memorializing resolution, a type of resolution that requests action from a government body or official. The resolution was filed by at-large council member and mayoral candidate Erica Gilmore.

Gilmore called the state legislation “harmful,” adding that the bill would “tear apart families.” Nashville's police chief and school board members have also questioned the bill, she said.

2. Council member admits to solicitation citation

At the end of last night’s meeting, council member Robert Swope admitted to a prostitution solicitation citation that occured 20 years ago. Swope detailed the incident, saying he was issued a citation in 1998 in Hamilton County.

Swope said he was not arrested, but due to “court misunderstandings,” a warrant may remain active.

“I have grown, met an incredible woman, gotten married and I've tried to serve my community and country as honorably as I could," Swope said.

The council member said his decision to come clean about the incident was sparked by a political opponent who discovered the citation. Swope is vying for a spot on the state's Republican Party Executive Committee.

3. Emissions testing will continue in Davison County

As we reported yesterday, Metro Council voted 28-7 at Tuesday night’s meeting to continue the emissions testing program in Davidson County.

The resolution comes after state lawmakers eliminated mandatory emissions tests in six counties, including Davidson County, if they meet the Environmental Protection Agency's air quality standards.

Governor Bill Haslam signed the bill into law on Tuesday.

The resolution's passing allows the city to continue the emissions contracts approved last year through 2022. The council will review emissions testing in Nashville when the contracts expire in four years.

The council meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month in the David Scobey Council Chambers at the Metro Courthouse. The courthouse is located at 1 Public Square in Nashville.

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