3.3% of voters in Williamson County cast ballots during early voting as of Feb. 20

Early voting began Feb. 18 in the 2020 Tennessee primary. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Early voting began Feb. 18 in the 2020 Tennessee primary. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Early voting began Feb. 18 in the 2020 Tennessee primary. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

This article will be updated until early voting ends Feb. 25.



With less than one week of early voting opportunities left before the March 3 primary, a total of 5,294 registered voters, or about 3.3%, have cast their ballots as of Feb. 20, according to the Williamson County Election Commission.



The early voter turnout for the 2016 primary was 14,223, or 10%, according to the commission.



Early voting began Feb. 12 at two out of five locations in the county, including the Williamson County Administrative Complex at 1320 W. Main St., Franklin, and the John P. Holt Library at 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood. All five early voting locations opened Feb. 18, and early voting at all locations will end Feb. 25.



“Early voting is extremely popular with many of our voters because it allows some flexibility to those who may be unable to cast a ballot on election day,” Administrator of Elections Chad Gray said in a release. “However, if you do vote on election day, March 3, voters may now go to any of our 25 Election Day Convenience Vote Center sites from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. regardless of your place of residence inside the county.”



Tennessee, along with 13 other states, will participate in the March 3 Super Tuesday primary to help determine candidates for president. Williamson County voters will also see three incumbent Republican candidates running unopposed for the three local positions, including Dusty Rhoades for sheriff, Brad Coleman for assessor of property and Mike Spitzer for circuit court judge, 21st District.





Important dates to know




  • Feb. 12: first day of early voting

  • Feb. 25: last day to apply for absentee ballot

  • Feb. 25: last day of early voting

  • March 3: primary election day



What to expect on the ballot



The following candidates listed may vary based on voters' primary preferences.



U.S. president




  • R: Donald J. Trump*

  • R: Joe Walsh

  • R: Bill Weld

  • D: Michael Bennet**

  • D: Joseph R. Biden

  • D: Michael R. Bloomberg

  • D: Cory Booker**

  • D: Pete Buttigieg

  • D: Julián Castro**

  • D: John K. Delaney**

  • D: Tulsi Gabbard

  • D: Kamala Harris**

  • D: Amy Klobuchar

  • D: Deval Patrick**

  • D: Bernie Sanders

  • D: Tom Steyer

  • D: Elizabeth Warren

  • D: Marianne Williamson**

  • D: Andrew Yang**


Williamson County sheriff


  • R: Dusty Rhoades*



Williamson County assessor of property




  • R: Brad Coleman*



District 21 Circuit Court judge




  • R: Mike Spitzer*



*Denotes incumbent candidates or candidate appointed to an unexpired term



**Denotes candidates that have dropped out of the presidential race but will still appear on the ballot.



Early voting



Williamson County residents can cast a ballot at any of the five early voting locations beginning Feb. 18, regardless of their actual place of residence.



During the early voting period, which ends Feb. 25, polls are open 8 a.m.-6 p.m. (weekdays) and 8 a.m.-noon (Saturdays). Polls will be closed Feb. 17 for Presidents’ Day.




  • Williamson County Administrative Complex: 1320 W. Main St., Franklin

  • The John P. Holt Brentwood Library: 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood

  • Fairview Recreation Center: 2714 Fairview Blvd., Fairview

  • Nolensville Recreation Center: 7250 Nolensville Road, Nolensville

  • Longview Recreation Center: 2909 Commonwealth Drive, Spring Hill



What to bring



Tennessee voters are required to present one of six specific forms of photo identification before they may cast their ballots.



Voters must present one of the following forms of ID to vote:




  • Tennessee driver’s license

  • Tennessee personal ID card

  • Tennessee license to carry a handgun

  • U.S. citizenship certificate with photo

  • U.S. military ID with photo

  • U.S. passport



Voters who cannot obtain one of the six acceptable forms of photo ID due to a reasonable impediment may present a supporting form of identification and execute a Reasonable Impediment Declaration.



Supporting forms of ID that can be presented for voters with a reasonable impediment are:




  • Valid voter registration certificate

  • Original certified birth certificate

  • Copy of or original current utility bill

  • Copy of or original bank statement

  • Copy of or original government check

  • Copy of or original paycheck

  • Copy of or original government document with voter’s name and an address (original required if it contains a photograph)



MOST RECENT

With a clinical background in internal, pulmonary and critical care medicine, Corry has been with BCM for 20 years. He now focuses primarily on inflammatory lung diseases, such as asthma and smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. (Graphic by Ronald Winters/Community Impact Newspaper)
Q&A: Baylor College of Medicine's Dr. David Corry discusses immunity, vaccine production amid COVID-19 pandemic

Rapid development and distribution of a vaccine worldwide and successful achievement of herd immunity will be key players in determining the lifespan of the COVID-19 pandemic, said Dr. David Corry, a professor of Medicine in the Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology Section at Baylor College of Medicine.

Here are the coronavirus data updates to know today in Tennessee. (Community Impact staff)
Tennessee coronavirus cases rise by over 1,900 in 24 hours

In Davidson County, there have been at least 12,935 reported cases. Williamson County has reported 1,670 cases.

Williamson County Schools released a reopening framework plan for students and families on July 9 before school begins in early August, with students given the option to receive on-campus or remote instruction. (Courtesy Pixabay)
Williamson County Schools’ 2020-21 plan plus four other Nashville stories

Here are five recent updates from Greater Nashville on plans for education in the fall, governmental moves toward increased public safety and more.

Williamson County Schools released a reopening framework plan for students and families on July 9 before school begins in early August, with students given the option to receive on-campus or remote instruction. (Courtesy Pixabay)
Williamson County Schools releases plans for optional return to on-campus learning in fall

The district will be in communication with the county health department to determine whether to adjust plans based on the number of active COVID-19 cases in the county.

(Courtesy Pixabay)
Columbia State Community College to offer hybrid of virtual, in-person instruction for fall semester

The college, which has a campus in Franklin, said all lecture courses will be live streamed via Zoom, allowing students and faculty to interact in real time.

The Tennessee State Capitol Commission voted July 9 to remove the Nathan Bedford Forrest bust from the state capitol. (Screenshot via www.tn.gov)
Commission votes to remove Nathan Bedford Forrest bust from Tennessee Capitol, but it will not be moved just yet

The final decision on moving the bust will be made by the Tennessee Historic Commission.

Tennessee coronavirus cases rise by over 1,600 in 24 hours

The daily totals also include 710 cumulative deaths, 3,088 cumulative hospitalizations and an estimated 33,609 recoveries to date.

Census worker
2020 census: Bureau prepares nonresponse follow-up field operations

For individuals who have not responded to the 2020 census, one of about 500,000 census takers will visit the their household between Aug. 11-Oct. 31.

Here are the coronavirus data updates to know today in Tennessee. (Community Impact staff)
Tennessee coronavirus cases rise by over 2,400 in 24 hours, marking the largest single-day increase in cases to date

The daily totals also include 685 cumulative deaths, 3,025 cumulative hospitalizations and an estimated 32,736 recoveries to date.

A new committee has been formed to discuss the possibility of changing the Rebel mascot of Franklin High School and is seeking feedback from the public. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
New committee to explore changing Franklin High mascot

Franklin High School’s mascot was originally the Pioneers, but was changed to the Rebels in 1936.