Park Guide: 26 public parks to visit in Williamson County

FRB Parks Guide
Both Franklin and Brentwood are rich with parks and trails featuring a number of viewsheds, amenities and historic sites. (Chelsea King/Community Impact Newspaper)

Both Franklin and Brentwood are rich with parks and trails featuring a number of viewsheds, amenities and historic sites. (Chelsea King/Community Impact Newspaper)

With both the city of Franklin and the city of Brentwood declaring states of emergency and urging everyone in the area to practice social distancing, parks are one of the last refuges where people can get outside and stay active while practicing social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic.


Both Franklin and Brentwood are rich with parks and trails featuring a number of viewsheds, amenities and historic sites, though all playgrounds, basketball courts, dog parks, skate parks, tennis courts, sports fields and batting cages in Franklin are now closed, according to a March 26 announcement from City Administrator Eric Stuckey.

“Many families enjoy our City parks and they can still do that in wide open spaces and keeping a physical distance of six feet from non-family members,” Stuckey said. “Some folks are continuing to gather in close-contact spaces like playgrounds, basketball courts, dog parks, skate parks and batting cages. In order to protect everyone, we are closing those spaces until further notice.”

Visitors to Franklin and Brentwood parks are encouraged to follow the Centers for Disease Control's guidelines and maintain a distance off at least six feet from others and to not be in the same location as 10 or more people. Restrooms in Franklin parks will remain open.


Below are a list and a map of a few of the public parks to be found in the area, as well as some of the amenities they include.

This list is not comprehensive.




Brentwood



1. Deerwood Arboretum



320 Deerwood Lane, Brentwood



This state-certified arboretum includes over 60 tree species across its 27 acres that borders the Harpeth River in Brentwood.



Amenities: bike paths, jogging trails, ponds, a wildflower meadow, restrooms and an ampitheater.



2. Flagpole Park



1560 Mallory Lane, Brentwood



This park takes its name for the flags that flew on the 8.7 acre-property along I-65.



Amenities: Two multi-purpose sports fields, a half-court basketball court, walking trail and restrooms.



3. Granny White Park



610 Granny White Pike, Brentwood



The 32-acre park is located next to Brentwood Middle School and Brentwood High School.



Amenities: walking and exercise trails, a pavilion, a multi-purpose athletic field, four lighted tennis courts, baseball/softball fields and a playground.



4. Margaret Hayes Powell Park



307 Oakvale Drive, Brentwood



This 22-acre park is located at the corner of Virginia Way and Granny White Pike.



Amenities: One paved, multi-use trail and a 0.4 mile wooded trail.



5. Maryland Way Park



5055 Maryland Way, Brentwood



This 7-acre park is located in the Maryland Farms complex and was home to Brentwood’s first 4th of July celebration.



Amenities: A walking path and 11 exercise stations.



6. Wikle Park



7043 Wikle Road W., Brentwood



This 15-acre park is located at the east end of Wikle Road West.



Amenities: A playground, pavedd walking paths, play lawns, two gazebos with tables and restrooms.



7. Barkwood Dog Park



Tower Park, Brentwood



Located in the southwest corner of Tower Park, the Barkwoodd Dog Park consists of two fenced-in play areas for large and small dogs that measure over 2 acres.



Amenities: Shaded benches, water stations and hydrants.



8. Concord Park



8109 Concord Road, Brentwood



This 40-acre-park surrounds the John P. Holt Library in Brentwood.



Amenities: Walking paths, bikeways, practice fields and open areas for picnics and kite-flying.



9. Crockett Park



1500 Volunteer Parkway, Brentwood



This park is home to the Cool Springs House and the Eddy Arnold Amphitheater, where the Brentwood Summer Concert Series and the annual 4th of July Celebration take place.



Amenities: Eight multi-purpose fields, eight lighted baseball fields, seven lighted tennis courts, restrooms, open fields, a nature trail, paved walking paths and bike ways, a playground and an amphitheater.



10. Marcella Vivrette Smith Park



1825 Wilson Pike, Brentwood



This 400-acre park was acquired by the city of Brentwood in 2010 and is home to the historic Ravenswood Farm property on Wilson Pike.



Amenities: Six miles of hiking trails, one restroom facility and the Ravenswood Mansion.



11. Owl Creek Park



9751 Concord Road, Brentwood



This 21-acre-park is located between Chestnut Springs Road and Concord Pass.



Amenities: A picnic shelter, a playground, basketball courts, walking paths and restrooms with a water fountain.



12. Primm Park



Off of Moores Lane East near Montclair Subdivision, Brentwood



This 31-acre-park includes the historic Boiling Spring Academy and several Native American ceremonial mounds.



Amenities: Paved walking trails and historic sites.



13. River Park



1100 Knox Valley Drive, Brentwood



This park extends over 46 acres along the Harpeth River, connecting Crockett Park and Concord Park.



Amenities: A two-mile bike trail, a picnic pavilion with two grills, an outdoor basketball court, a walking trail, a playground and restrooms.



14. Tower Park



920 Heritage Way, Brentwood



This 47-acre park surrounds the historic WSM broadcast tower in Brentwood, from which the park gets its name.



Amenities: Walking trails, biking trails, a dog park and natural open spaces.



Franklin



15. Pinkerton Park



405 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin



This 34-acre park is the most highly-used passive park in Franklin and is home to many of the city’s spring events.



Amenities: Three pavilions, a one-mile walking trail, two playgrounds (closed as of March 27), grills and restrooms.



16. Aspen Grove Park



3200 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin



This Cool Springs-area park stretches or 14 acres along Spencer Creek.



Amenities: A large, covered pavilion with grills, outlets and lights, restrooms, a walking trail and a playground (closed as of March 27).



17. The Park at Harlinsdale Farm



239 Franklin Road, Franklin



Originally a historic farm associated with the Tennessee Walking Horse breeding industry by the Harlinsdale family, the city of Franklin purchased the farm’s 200 acres and converted it into a passive park that maintains the area’s history.



Amenities: A 4-acre dog park (closed as of March 27), a 3-acre fishing pond, restrooms, a 5-kilometer soft track, public parking and an equestrian trail.



18. Winstead Hill Park



4023 Columbia Ave., Franklin



Located south of downtown Franklin this 61-acre farm is home to a historic Civil War-era battle site.



Amenities: A walking trail, restrooms and a Civil War monument.



19. Liberty Park



2080 Turning Wheel Lane, Franklin



This 84.6-acre park is home to organized baseball games in the spring, summer and fall each year.



Amenities: Three tournament play baseball fields (closed as of March 26), a 10-hole disc golf course and restrooms.



20. Jim Warren Park



705 Boyd Mill Ave., Franklin



This 58-acre park is home to the Franklin Baseball Club and the Franklin Cowboys youth organizations, along with a wide array of sports fields.



Amenities: Two pavilions, 12 lighted baseball fields (closed as of March 26), four football fields (closed as of March 27), two multi-purpose fields (closed as of March 27), two playgrounds (closed as of March 27), eight tennis courts (closed as of March 27), a two-and-a-half mile walking trail, one outdoor basketball court (closed as of March 26), a fishing pond, restrooms and a skatepark (closed as of March 27).



21. Judge Fulton Greer Park



1120 Hillsboro Road, Franklin



This park surround the Franklin Recreation Complex off of Hillsboro Road.



Amenities: A walking trail, a playground (closed as of March 26), pavilions, six tennis courts (closed a of March 27), two sand volleyball courts and three soccer fields (closed as of March 27).



22. Eastern Flank Battle Field Park



1368 Eastern Flank Circle, Franklin



This 110-acre passive park is the former site of the historic Battle of Franklin.



Amenities: The Eastern Flank Event Facility, restrooms, walking and historic interpreted trails.



23. Fieldstone Park



1377 Hillsboro Road, Franklin



This 37-acre park is where the Williamson County Parks and Recreation Department coordinates aduult softball programs.



Amenities: Two pavilions, four adult softball fields (closed as of March 27), a children’s playground (closed ass of March 27), grills and restrooms.



24. Del Rio Park



1100 Del Rio Court, Franklin



This small, passive neighborhood park is located in the Rogersshire Subdivision off of Del Rio Pike.



Amenities: A gazebo, a playground (closed as off March 27), a picnic table and a grill.



25. Carter’s Hill Park



1259 Columbia Ave, Franklin



This 1-acre park is home to a monument to the Assault of the Cotton Gin event during the Battle of Franklin.



Amenities: Walking paths, benches, interpretive signage and a monument.



26. Fort Granger



113 Fort Granger Drive, Franklin



This 14.5-acre park is located behind Pinkerton Park and includes trenches dug by Civil War troops.



Amenities: Wooden walkways, benches, scenic views and historic trenches.



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