Habitat for Humanity ReStore supports affordable housing in Williamson, Maury counties

Habitat for Humanity ReStore has been in the Franklin area since 2005 and supports the creation of affordable housing, said ReStore Director Ansel Rogers (second from left). (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)
Habitat for Humanity ReStore has been in the Franklin area since 2005 and supports the creation of affordable housing, said ReStore Director Ansel Rogers (second from left). (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Habitat for Humanity ReStore has been in the Franklin area since 2005 and supports the creation of affordable housing, said ReStore Director Ansel Rogers (second from left). (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

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For those looking to update their home’s sustainably, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore offers a 12,000-square-foot warehouse of home goods while supporting the creation of affordable housing in the community.

The ReStore location in Franklin is affiliated with Habitat for Humanity Williamson-Maury and features furniture, decor, cabinets, lighting, appliances and other home goods. Items are both gently used and new, as the nonprofit works with nearby retailers such as Lowe’s and Costco that donate new items. The store also offers building materials, paint, fixtures and tools.

Proceeds from the ReStore, which has been in the Franklin area since 2005, go to fund Habitat projects that create workforce housing in Williamson and Maury counties. According to Habitat, the store raises enough to fund the creation of three to four new homes annually.

“We’re basically a fundraiser for Habitat,” ReStore Director Ansel Rogers said. “We take donations, bring them back here and all of our revenue basically goes back into affordable housing.”

According to Habitat, the nonprofit will begin work on a project to build in Columbia this fall and is currently in need of sponsors and volunteers. Homeowners who move into Habitat homes also work at the store as part of their “sweat equity,” in which they volunteer with the nonprofit as part of their partnership.


Those looking to donate items can either bring items to the store’s location on Columbia Avenue or take advantage of the nonprofit’s free pick-up or DeConstruct options, in which the nonprofit’s team will salvage kitchen cabinets from a remodel to be reused or sold. Residents are advised to call or email the store prior to donating items. Because inventory is constantly changing, Rogers said the store often provides updates on the locations Facebook page to showcase new items. Additionally, ReStore holds a sale at the end of every month with items up to 30% off regular prices.

Rogers said buying and donating through ReStore not only helps support the nonprofit, but also diverts what would otherwise become waste from going to landfills. According to Habitat, the ReStore can salvage as much as 989,000 pounds—or nearly 500 tons—of household goods that would otherwise be thrown away in one year.

“We’re keeping stuff out of landfills and giving people something to do with their used materials, so we’re kind of unique in that,” Rogers said.

Habitat for Humanity ReStore

1725 Columbia Ave., Franklin

615-690-8090

www.hfhwm.org/restore

Hours: Tue.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sundays
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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