Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declares March 20 Franklin Tomorrow Day

Franklin Tomorrow
Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declared March 20 as Franklin Tomorrow Day for the city. (Courtesy Deborah Varallo/Varallo PR)

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declared March 20 as Franklin Tomorrow Day for the city. (Courtesy Deborah Varallo/Varallo PR)

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore declared March 20 as Franklin Tomorrow Day for the city and presented the proclamation to Executive Director Mindy Tate and Board President Allena Bell, thanking the organization for the work it does in the city.

“During the past 20 years, Franklin Tomorrow’s work has had a positive impact on the city of Franklin and its residents through its work to engage the community, foster collaboration and advocate for a shared vision for the future of Franklin,” Moore said in a release.


Franklin Tomorrow was founded as a nonprofit in 2000 by a group of local business and civic leaders to promote community involvement with events, educational programs and forums and collaborates with the city of Franklin, Williamson, Inc., Franklin Special School District and other local organizations.

“We are so honored that the city of Franklin is recognizing Franklin Tomorrow’s 20th year by declaring March 20 Franklin Tomorrow Day,” Tate said in a release. “Franklin Tomorrow continues to work hard to make sure we are creating an environment in Franklin that allows its citizens to be engaged and collaborative all while enhancing the City of Franklin to make it a better place in the future.”

Franklin Tomorrow originally planned to celebrate its 20th anniversary with a special event March 20, butt had to reschedule to July 30 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park due to coronavirus concerns.


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