Williamson Medical Center recognized with a Center of Excellence designation in education, training for neonatal drug withdrawal syndrome

Williamson Medical Center earned a designation recognizing their excellence in education and training for neonatal care from the Vermont Oxford Network, the center announced Jan. 19 . (Rendering courtesy Williamson Medical Center)
Williamson Medical Center earned a designation recognizing their excellence in education and training for neonatal care from the Vermont Oxford Network, the center announced Jan. 19 . (Rendering courtesy Williamson Medical Center)

Williamson Medical Center earned a designation recognizing their excellence in education and training for neonatal care from the Vermont Oxford Network, the center announced Jan. 19 . (Rendering courtesy Williamson Medical Center)

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Williamson Medical Center earned a designation recognizing their excellence in education and training for neonatal care from the Vermont Oxford Network, the center announced Jan. 19 . (Courtesy-Williamson Medical Center)
The Williamson Medical Center announced Jan. 19 it has received a Center of Excellence award in education in training for infants and families affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome from the Vermont Oxford Network, a nonprofit organization that works to improve neonatal care.

The recognition acknowledges the center’s participation in the “Neonatal Abstinence Collaborative: Improving Care to Outcomes,” which includes training for multidisciplinary teams to care for NAS infants. NAS is drug withdrawal syndrome experienced by infants exposed to opioids while in utero, who are more likely to have respiratory complications, feeding difficulty, low birth weights and extended hospital stays, according to the center's announcement.


“WMC was proud to be a part of this important initiative developed to standardize and elevate the care of substance-exposed infants and families statewide,” Williamson Medical Center CEO Phil Mazzuca said. “Our award-winning obstetrics team is committed to [providing] exceptional care for the babies born at our hospital. The completion of this universal training further equips our team to ensure the best care for infants born with NAS.”

The NAS Collaborative in Tennessee was a joint effort with the Vermont Oxford Network, which collaborates with hospitals nationwide to identify ways to improve the provision of of neonatal care using data and the Tennessee Initiative for Perinatal Quality Care. Thirty hospitals in the state took part in the training, according to WMC’s announcement on the recognition.
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