Brentwood, Franklin declare states of emergency after flooding, waive fees for rebuilding

Williamson County saw several inches of rain March 27-28. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)
Williamson County saw several inches of rain March 27-28. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Williamson County saw several inches of rain March 27-28. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

On March 27, Williamson County received several inches of rain that caused damage to a number of homes and businesses, prompting local officials to take action.

The cities of Franklin and Brentwood have both declared states of emergency as of March 30, which will allow the cities to apply for aid and to begin cleanup across the area.

So far, dozens of homes across both cities have been reported as damaged. City officials said the emergency order will allow city staff to begin the cleanup process as soon as possible.

“This means some standard operational processes like bidding, which can sometimes take weeks to conduct, can be waived to expedite services to assist citizens affected by this emergency," Brentwood City Manager Kirk Bednar said in a release.

The emergency orders also allow the cities to waive some fees for residents that would normally be collected as part of the building process.


“While we are confident that our community will come through this flooding event in good shape, there are private property owners and city facilities that have been impacted," Franklin Mayor Ken Moore said in a release. "This declaration will allow us to get resources to those impacted by the flood the help that they need as quickly as possible. This executive order also allows the city administrator and our staff team to waive permit fees for those impacted by the flooding.”

In Franklin, residents can report damage here. Brentwood residents can fill out the city's storm damage assessment here.

In both cities, residents are advised to report damage and secure visits from city staff to assess homes and issue permits before beginning repairs.

"We understand this is a difficult time for those in our community. We want to do everything we can to make rebuilding a home as easy as possible,” Bednar said.
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.