Franklin BOMA expected to appoint former mayor John Schroer to fill vacant seat through 2021

The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen is scheduled to meet next on Jan. 26. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)
The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen is scheduled to meet next on Jan. 26. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen is scheduled to meet next on Jan. 26. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Following the death of Alderperson Pearl Bransford in November, the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen has taken steps to fill her seat.

The BOMA voted 6-1 Jan. 12 to appoint a representative to fill the vacant seat until the city’s next election, which is scheduled for Oct. 26, according to the Williamson County Election Commission. The one dissenting vote was from Alderperson Dana McClendon, who said the seat should be left vacant until the next city election.

During the meeting, Alderperson Brandy Blanton proposed appointing former mayor John Schroer, who served as mayor from 2007-2011. Schroer also served on the Franklin Special School District Board and as a commissioner for the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

“I think it would behoove us to have somebody who is not only familiar with this board and the city at large,” Blanton said. “I think he’s uniquely equipped to assume this role to help us.”

According to Blanton, Schroer has said in discussions he has no intention of serving long term and would be expected to be replaced in the October election.


The BOMA is expected to vote on Schroer’s nomination during its next meeting Jan. 26. If approved, Schroer will be seated as an alderperson at-large later that evening.

Following the appointment, the seat will reopen in October and will be added to the ballot along with the city’s four ward positions, which are up for election this year.

Alternative options included leaving the seat vacant, scheduling a special election or appointing an individual to serve the remainder of Bransford 's term, which is slated to expire in 2023.
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.