Franklin Elementary selected as National ESEA Distinguished School

Franklin Elementary School has been named as a a 2019 National ESEA Distinguished School. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Franklin Elementary School has been named as a a 2019 National ESEA Distinguished School. (Courtesy Fotolia)

Franklin Elementary School has been named as a a 2019 National ESEA Distinguished School. (Courtesy Fotolia)

One of only two schools selected statewide, Franklin Elementary School has been named as a a 2019 National ESEA Distinguished School, according to a Jan. 8 announcement from Franklin Special School District.

Schools are selected based on student performance and academic growth, closing achievement gaps for two or more consecutive years and excelling in serving varying student populations, according to FSSD.


“The academic growth of all students is grounded in the focus and dedication by the teachers, staff members and leadership at Franklin Elementary," Director of Schools David Snowden said in a statement. "Their consistent use of student data to inform instructional decisions remains paramount in their work each day."

Only 73 schools across the country were selected this year by the ESEA—formerly known as the National Title I Association—which selects federally funded programs for recognition each year.

“Our consistent academic growth and performance is a direct result of the work of a talented, dedicated faculty and staff who set high expectations for every student,” FES Principal Anne Riley said in a statement. “Our teachers have support from highly skilled reading and math coaches, specialists from the District, and actively engaged parents. The overall positive atmosphere at Franklin Elementary encourages students to thrive.”
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


MOST RECENT

Screenshot via www.tn.gov
No decision yet on extending Tennessee's stay-at-home order as April 14 deadline approaches

New models show cases could peak by May, but only if social distancing continues.

(Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Tennessee State Board of Education approves emergency rules to amend graduation requirements

A new set of requirements will be put in place for graduating seniors.

Initial claims for unemployment insurance are increasing across the nation in the midst of COVID-19. (Courtesy Adobe Stock) (Courtesy Fotolia)
Tennessee residents have filed nearly 250,000 unemployment claims in past three weeks

The state typically receives fewer than 10,000 new claims in a three-week period.

The new filing deadline for the Hall Tax is July 15. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Tennessee extends Hall Tax deadline to July due to coronavirus

The new filing deadline for the Hall Tax is July 15.

The stay at home order for Franklin is intended to slow the spread of the virus and has to be renewed every week. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
City of Franklin renews state of emergency declaration and stay at home order

The stay at home order for Franklin is intended to slow the spread of the virus and has to be renewed every week.

Rabbi Joshua Kullock and Metro Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson participated in a Passover tradition April 8 while practicing social distancing guidelines. (Courtesy Metro Nashville)
Nashville Jewish community prepares for Passover amid social distancing

Local religious leaders are urging parishioners to continue social distancing through the holidays.

(Community Impact Newspaper Staff)
ROUNDUP: Coronavirus updates across Metro Nashville

Here are some recent Nashville-area stories readers may have missed.

Human trials for new drugs could begin as soon as later this year. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Vanderbilt University Medical Center working to find COVID-19 treatments

Human trials for new drugs could begin as soon as later this year.

The United Way of Greater Nashville announced April 7 a second round of funding to 27 local nonprofit groups helping individuals and families negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. (Lindsay Scott/Community Impact Newspaper)
United Way sends over $500,000 to Tennessee nonprofits

The United Way’s COVID-19 Response Fund, in partnership with Mayor John Cooper’s office and local partners, has raised just over $3.6 million since its inception

Restaurants all over the county are closing or offfering curbside and delivery services. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
ROUNDUP: 5 coronavirus stories Nashville-area readers may have missed

Here are five coronavirus-related stories readers in the Nashville area should know about.

(Community Impact Newspaper Staff)
Cards of Care in downtown Franklin converted to small food pantry

The box, which usually holds cards, now has food for those in need.