Franklin Special School District hires new associate director of schools

David Esslinger headshot
David Esslinger will become the new associate director for finance and administration Dec. 2. (Courtesy Franklin Special School District)

David Esslinger will become the new associate director for finance and administration Dec. 2. (Courtesy Franklin Special School District)

Franklin Special School District has appointed a new associate director of schools for finance and administration following the retirement of Charles Arnold.

David Esslinger will begin his position effective Dec. 2, according to FSSD. Esslinger is currently the principal at Franklin Elementary School and has spent 30 years in education.


“Dr. Esslinger is a proven leader with exceptional communication and interpersonal skills, which will transition well to his role as Associate Director of Schools for Finance and Administration,” Director of Schools David Snowden said in a statement. “With his experience in supervision and school finance, he will make a seamless transition into this new role. He is extremely organized and very [detail] oriented in all areas of his responsibility.”

As associate director for finance and administration, Esslinger will be responsible for overseeing accounting and payroll, human resources, district facilities and equipment, safety and transportation.

Arnold will serve as a consultant for the district during the 2020-21 budget workshops, Snowden said during the FSSD school board meeting Nov. 18.
By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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