Williamson County Schools calls for rezoning, officials hold public input meetings before Nov. 18 vote

Zoning meeting
Williamson County School officials meet with parents and residents to discuss the changes to WCS zoning on Nov. 7. Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper

Williamson County School officials meet with parents and residents to discuss the changes to WCS zoning on Nov. 7. Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper

Williamson County Schools held a meeting Nov. 7 to educate the public and receive input on its proposed zoning plan for two new schools opening next year.



“We want to hear from you,” WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said to a cafeteria full of parents. “We want to find out if there’s something unique in your life that we’ve missed ... that might have an impact in our decision-making about this zoning.”



If approved by the school board at its Nov. 18 meeting, the plan would address overcrowding at WCS elementary and middle schools and would take effect in August 2020.



According to a presentation given by Planning and Zoning Supervisor Allison Nunley, Thompson’s Station Elementary, Trinity Elementary and Spring Station Middle are already at or exceed their intended student capacity.



With the new Creekside Elementary School building opening in January 2020, the new zoning would divert 55 students from College Grove Elementary School and 78 from Trinity Elementary School by August in order to offset the projected growth.



Nunley said that WCS was actively looking for land to build additional elementary schools to keep up with 3-5 year growth projections.



The new Central East Middle School—which is not yet named—would take 239 students from Heritage Middle School and 185 students from Thompson’s Station Middle School, while Spring Station Middle School would send 172 students to Heritage and 58 to Thompson’s Station.



Nunley said WCS is not recommending changes to any high school zones at this time, although additions to Independence High School are scheduled to be completed by January 2020, and classroom additions and a cafeteria expansion to Summit High School are included in the board's five-year capital improvement projects in order to increase student capacity.

The board will discuss the new rezoning plan at its Nov. 14 workshop meeting and will vote whether to rezone the schools Nov. 18.



View the zoning plan here.



MOST RECENT

The stay at home order for Franklin is intended to slow the spread of the virus and has to be renewed every week. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
City of Franklin renews state of emergency declaration and stay at home order

The stay at home order for Franklin is intended to slow the spread of the virus and has to be renewed every week.

Rabbi Joshua Kullock and Metro Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson participated in a Passover tradition April 8 while practicing social distancing guidelines. (Courtesy Metro Nashville)
Nashville Jewish community prepares for Passover amid social distancing

Local religious leaders are urging parishioners to continue social distancing through the holidays.

(Community Impact Newspaper Staff)
ROUNDUP: Coronavirus updates across Metro Nashville

Here are some recent Nashville-area stories readers may have missed.

Human trials for new drugs could begin as soon as later this year. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Vanderbilt University Medical Center working to find COVID-19 treatments

Human trials for new drugs could begin as soon as later this year.

The United Way of Greater Nashville announced April 7 a second round of funding to 27 local nonprofit groups helping individuals and families negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. (Lindsay Scott/Community Impact Newspaper)
United Way sends over $500,000 to Tennessee nonprofits

The United Way’s COVID-19 Response Fund, in partnership with Mayor John Cooper’s office and local partners, has raised just over $3.6 million since its inception

Restaurants all over the county are closing or offfering curbside and delivery services. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
ROUNDUP: 5 coronavirus stories Nashville-area readers may have missed

Here are five coronavirus-related stories readers in the Nashville area should know about.

(Community Impact Newspaper Staff)
Cards of Care in downtown Franklin converted to small food pantry

The box, which usually holds cards, now has food for those in need.

downtown nashville
Middle Tennessee hospitality coalition creates relief fund for workers amid coronavirus-related closures

The fund will grant up to $1,000 to local hospitality workers and small businesses who are eligible for aid.

The map represents 602 of the 926 cases confirmed coronavirus cases reported to the Metro Nashville Public Health Department as of April 6. (Courtesy Metro Nashville)
Metro Nashville map shows concentrations of coronavirus cases by zip code

According to public health officials, some of the concentrations on the map can be traced to group gatherings.

Restaurants all over the county are closing or offfering curbside and delivery services. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
Williamson County restaurants continue adjusting food options amid coronavirus outbreak

Restaurants all over the county are closing or offfering curbside and delivery services