United Way to host Big Backpack Giveaway for Williamson County residents July 27

The United Way of Williamson County hosts its annual Big Backpack Giveaway on July 27 to help families in Williamson County get ready for the first day of school.

More than 100 volunteers will be at four sites across the county to give away hundreds of backpacks filled with grade-appropriate school supplies, according to a UWWC news release.

“This year, our goal is to provide at least 2,500 backpacks to local students,” said Debby Rainey, manager for United Way’s Volunteer Center and vice president of strategic initiatives, in a statement.

Supplies come from United Way's Stuff the Bus campaign, a supplies drive held earlier this year in partnership with Publix Super Markets, General Motors, United Automobile Workers, First Fleet, UPS and GraceWorks Ministries. Last year's donations totaled more than $130,000 worth of supplies, according to the release.

Rainey said she hopes the drive will help families who struggle to afford supplies due to the rising cost of living in the area.

“Sometimes, caregivers have to choose between bills and school supplies, and we know that teachers often fund school supply shortages from their own paychecks,” Rainey said. “The backpack giveaway eliminates some of the obstacles caregivers face, and it keeps children from starting school at a disadvantage.”

Families can pick up supplies at the following locations:

Bethesda United Methodist Church
4812 Bethesda Road, Thompson’s Station
Time: 10 a.m.-noon

Westview United Methodist Church
7107 Westview Drive, Fairview
Time: 10 a.m.-noon

Johnson Elementary School
815 Glass Lane, Franklin
Time: 4-6 p.m.

Liberty Elementary School
600 Liberty Pike, Franklin
Time: 4-6 p.m.

The giveaway is open to Williamson County residents; however, students must be present in order to pick up supplies.

For those wanting to learn more about volunteering or how to help, visit www.uwwc.org/patriciahart/stuff-the-bus.
By Wendy Sturges

A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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