Williamson County Schools Superintendent Mike Looney named lone finalist for Fulton County Schools superintendent search

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Williamson County Schools Superintendent Mike Looney has been named the lone finalist in Fulton County Schools' search for a new superintendent.

Fulton County is located in Atlanta, Georgia and has more than 95,000 students at more than 100 schools, according to the district website.

FCS School Board President Linda Bryant made the announcement April 16 in a special-called meeting that was streamed live on Facebook.

“I am really excited to announce the board of education has selected Dr. Mike Looney as the finalist for the position of superintendent,” Bryant said. “After conducting a national search which attracted a diverse group of talented candidates we believe that Dr. Looney is the right person, the right leader at the right time for Fulton County Schools.”

Looney, who was present at the FCS meeting, spoke briefly after the announcement.

“I really look forward to spending the next couple of days here in Fulton County and getting to know as many people as I possibly can, visiting as many schools as possible and interacting with students, teachers, parents and community members,” Looney said. “You have a very engaged school board here in Fulton County, and that’s one of the reasons I’m attracted in coming.”

Looney has not made a formal announcement saying he will take the position or when he might leave the district. As mandated by Georgia law, the district must have a 14-day waiting period to allow for public input from the community, according to FCS. After that period, Looney could be formally offered the job in early May.

WCS board chairman Gary Anderson released a statement on the announcement this morning.

"On behalf of the Williamson County Board of Education, I want to thank Dr. Looney for his service to Williamson County Schools and wish him the best in his next endeavor," Anderson said. "Should Dr. Looney sign a contract with Fulton County Schools on May 2, the WCS Board, at its regular May meeting, plans to name an interim superintendent and establish the effective date of that leadership transition. We have a strong leadership team in place at the central office and in our schools, and our teachers and staff are focused on success for all students. Our students come prepared to learn and achieve, and our parental involvement is second to none. For more than 25 years, Williamson County Schools has been recognized as a top performing school district in the state, and I believe that will continue for years to come. The Williamson County community should expect a seamless transition as we move on to our next superintendent of schools."

By Wendy Sturges
A Houston native and graduate of St. Edward's University in Austin, Wendy Sturges has worked as a community journalist covering local government, health care, business and development since 2011. She has worked with Community Impact since 2015 as a reporter and editor and moved to Tennessee in 2019.


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