Mojo’s Tacos offering to-go and pick-up orders at The Factory at Franklin

(From left to right) The Korean cauliflower taco is made with Gochujang sauce, Mojo sauce, ginger slaw and toasted sesame seeds.  The Brisket taco is made with smoked brisket, guajillo barbecue sauce and chipotle slaw. The Baja fish taco is made with beer-battered cod, shredded cabbage, pico de gallo and Mojo sauce. All tacos are $4. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
(From left to right) The Korean cauliflower taco is made with Gochujang sauce, Mojo sauce, ginger slaw and toasted sesame seeds. The Brisket taco is made with smoked brisket, guajillo barbecue sauce and chipotle slaw. The Baja fish taco is made with beer-battered cod, shredded cabbage, pico de gallo and Mojo sauce. All tacos are $4. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

(From left to right) The Korean cauliflower taco is made with Gochujang sauce, Mojo sauce, ginger slaw and toasted sesame seeds. The Brisket taco is made with smoked brisket, guajillo barbecue sauce and chipotle slaw. The Baja fish taco is made with beer-battered cod, shredded cabbage, pico de gallo and Mojo sauce. All tacos are $4. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Mojo's Tacos opened in the Factory at Franklin on Cinco de Mayo in 2018. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Mojo's Tacos opened in the Factory at Franklin on Cinco de Mayo in 2018. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Mojo's Tacos opened in the Factory at Franklin on Cinco de Mayo in 2018. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Co-owner Dave Story stands beside a picture of the taco restaurant's namesake, Mojo, the cow, behind the bar of Mojo's Tacos. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
Mojo’s, pronounced with a hard “J,” gets its name from a 2,700-pound bull that lives on the land of Bill Butler, one of the taco restaurant’s co-founders. A portrait of Mojo hangs behind the bar.

Since opening a brick-and-mortar location inside The Factory at Franklin in 2018 after spending a few months as a food truck, Mojo’s Tacos’ success has exceeded the expectations of its owners from day one, according to co-owner Dave Story.

“Our first day was Cinco de Mayo, and as you can imagine, it was chaos,” Story said. “We can’t complain about business. It’s blown us away. I’m just humbled because it’s food that I came up with with some of the prep cooks, and to see a line out the door on the weekends—it just makes you feel warm inside.”

Story, who is the culinary creative behind the food at Mojo’s, said the restaurant makes everything from scratch. He described the tacos he and his staff make as “like a relaxed-fit Levi’s jean—not a skinny jean” like other street tacos.

Story said the key to the restaurant’s success so far has been the staff, who have been there since the days when Mojo’s was only a food truck.


“[There’s] no way we could have projected that we’d be doing how we’re doing, and I think it’s a testament to the staff we’ve got. We’ve got the same staff we started with when we opened our truck,” Story said. “I’ve always said, ‘When I start my own business, I want to take care of the people,’ especially in this industry that’s notorious for just turning and burning people.”

Along with margaritas, draft beer and signature cocktails, Mojo’s menu has 11 unique taco choices inspired by the street tacos and food trucks of Austin, Texas, including favorites like the Korean cauliflower taco made with Gochujang sauce and ginger slaw, the puffy taco made with pork adovada in a fried flour tortilla and the Baja fish taco with beer-battered cod and shredded cabbage.

“Everyone can find a taco they like here, from kids to adults,” Story said. “[Mojo’s Tacos] is based off the Austin food trucks back in the day when I lived there in 2010. The thought was, ‘How do we take that style of taco that wasn’t here and give it the Tennessee twist and make it our own?’”

Editor's note: While under local restrictions due to the coronavirus outbreak, Mojo's is offering curbside pick-up and to-go orders only as of March 23. Customers can order online of over the phone and call 615-435-3476 upon arrival.

Mojo’s Tacos

230 Franklin Road, Franklin

615-435-3476

www.mojostacos.com


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