Herban Market creates space dedicated to organic foods

The Herban Caesar ($17) is a salad made with fresh greens, house-made Caesar dressing, bacon, grilled lemon, grilled scallions, roasted tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, toast points, Parmesan cheese and chicken. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
The Herban Caesar ($17) is a salad made with fresh greens, house-made Caesar dressing, bacon, grilled lemon, grilled scallions, roasted tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, toast points, Parmesan cheese and chicken. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Herban Caesar ($17) is a salad made with fresh greens, house-made Caesar dressing, bacon, grilled lemon, grilled scallions, roasted tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, toast points, Parmesan cheese and chicken. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

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The Messy Burger ($15) is made with a beef patty, bacon jam, avocado, cheese, an over-easy egg, house-made salsa, sprouts and pickled onions on a house-made bun. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Matt and Ashlea Hogancamp opened the doors of Herban Market in October 2015. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)
Matt and Ashlea Hogancamp said the concept of Herban Market came to them after they had their daughter.

“Having a full-time job while trying to feed your child healthy, high-quality stuff—we realized [it] was almost another full-time job to be able to research all of the products,” Ashlea said. “I just said, ‘There’s got to be a faster and more convenient way for a working mom and dad.’ So that’s kind of how it started.”

The couple, who lived in Houston, Texas, at the time, sold their house, left their jobs, moved to Franklin and opened Herban Market in 2015.

“We went all-in. We sold everything,” said Ashlea. “We took what was then a bunch of pennies and turned it into this. We invested it into Herban Market.”

In June 2019, the business expanded its location to add more space next to the market. It now operates not only a grocery and wellness store but also a coffee bar; a kombucha and wine bar; a bakery; an olive oil and balsamic vinegar bar; and an open-concept restaurant dedicated to serving organic, locally sourced food with high-quality ingredients.


“We wanted a one-stop-shop where people could come in and get everything they needed,” Ashlea said. “We also work really hard to make it affordable. You should be able to afford organic food that’s healthy.”

Herban Market’s menu, created by the market’s head chef, Carlos Garcia, includes a variety of healthy breakfast, lunch and dinner options made in-house that change seasonally with locally available ingredients.

“If people don’t care about health whatsoever, then they’re still going to enjoy the food,” Matt said.

Herban Market’s menu includes a selection of sandwiches, wraps, salads and bowls, with options for meat-eaters as well as vegetarians. A full menu of coffee drinks and juices is also available.

The Hogancamps said all of the food options they serve are put through rigorous research to meet the standards the business has to maintain its mission of serving fresh organic food.

“All of the meats are organic and are locally pastured,” Ashlea said. “To control the quality, we have an in-house bakery, so everything is made here so [that] we can not put the preservatives in and the nasty ingredients and things that tend to be put into our foods nowadays, and it just tastes better.”

Herban Market

3078 Maddux Way, Franklin

615-567-6240

www.herban-market.com

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.


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